antique post vice and anvil

I just inherited my great grandfather's post vice and anvil. The post vice has a stripped screw on the tightening mechanism. I want to
refurbish the vice. I thought about welding the threads on the male portion of the screw, and filing to shape. Part of the problem is on the female portion of the screw. It would be difficult to repair the female portion. Any Ideas? Maybe some expert I could send the screw to for refurbishment? I feel very lucky to have my great grandfathers tools, and I want to be able to use them. Thanks..
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Cool! :)
rec.crafts.metalworking ;)
Used to hang out there, just ignore the snooty ones, the rest (most) are great! :)
You can-not explain the situation in too much detail, ok?
Alvin in AZ ps- my grandma sold all that stuff with the farm without telling anyone, just up and sold it all
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mark wrote:

Know anyone with a metal lathe?
Been there, done that, ended up with a completely different vice for my troubles.
Best bet is to get into a decent catalog or a well stocked Nut and Bolt shop, and find a section of Acme threaded rod (acme is the name of the type of thread) of similar diameter, and a matching nut. Cut a section of rod to fit in place of the worn screw, weld it in, and have the nut turned to fit into the old nut (suitably bored out, of course) and welded in. Brand new matching threads. Way better than anything you could do with a file in one lifetime, unless you are a filing magician.
If you have a decent scrap yard around, or friends in low places that may be able to help you out, you could probably find a suitable section of threaded rod on the cheap. I would bet, with a it of experimenting, you could cast a workable nut around a section of the thread from brass or bronze.
I was scrounging through scrap dealers yards looking for parts for just such a rebuild on a not so old post vice, and came out with a pretty rough Peter Wright post vice with a perfect screw and nut on it for $25. Still have not welded the leg back together, but it's too nice to part the screw off of. :-) Still have not fixed the other one, either.
Most of the guys I know that do any smithing at all, have hoards of junk that they have gathered over the years. Often these piles will include a fair selection of broken or worn tools. Know any smiths? Is there an ABANA chapter around your area?
Cheers Trevor Jones
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Hint: Jacks and clamps. Automotive bumper jacks sometimes used this thread, scissor jacks too, large c-clamps might also have something you can use... --Glenn Lyford
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Acme threaded rod may work, but vises generally use square or buttress threads (much stronger).
Gary
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Gary Coffman wrote:

Told you r.c.m was a good place to go, there's one of the best r.c.m'ers right there. Gather all the information you can then do the job right the first time?
My sloppy way would be to make do with what I found at the scrap yard or a friend's bone yard. :/
Alvin in AZ (no longer on r.c.m and not missed;)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I agree with other posters that the best way to go is to get a brand new piece of acme threaded rod and a matching nut.
This company has been mentioned many times here: . Acme Threaded Rod, And Nuts -One Source: Green Bay Mfg. Box 56 Two Rivers, Wi 54241-0056 Phone (920) 793 2411 Fax (920) 793 4848 .
They will send you their catalog. They even sell squuare holes! (As in "make your own hardy tool holder").
Pete Stanaitis -------------
Mark wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.