differential tempered EUROPEAN swords

Bruce in Bangkok wrote:


I did a blacksmith course a couple of years back and the instructor demonstrated the concept of hardening and tempering in a one step process. This process wouldn't necessarily suit knife making...
The demonstration was making a scriber.
He heated up the metal to a cherry red (as you'd do with any spring steel), and quenched it. Then quickly he cleaned off the tool and watched as the resudule heat changed the colours of the tip, and dipped it in oil once again to halt the tempering stage. He then stabbed the point into a piece of mild steel plate, and left it sticking there.
The other students attempted this and failed, usually chipping off their tips in the process and having to re-forge another tip to try again.
I use a standard technique to harden mine, took the same amount of time and was still able to to the sticking into the steel plate thing.
I appreciated his demonstration, and the skill required to do it, but for my purposes I'd never use it so I stuck to a technique I know works for me :-)
Regards Charles
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snipped-for-privacy@optushome.com.au says...

Exactly, but showing off a bit. I can do it, or could when I was working at it, but (frankly) it was more a stunt to show that you really had your act together. When I was alone I usually hardened and then tempered in two heats.
--
Cheers,

Bruce in Bangkok
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No it ain't. :)

That subject is right down my alley. :)
I use what I call "the arrest point method" to determine the time to quench my knife blades and springs. There is a brighter section that's gone through the arrest point and a "shadowy" section that hasn't. The brighter section is usually the thinner sections and the darker section is usually the thicker sections.
As soon as the whole piece's color evens out... I-quick and quench it.
No magnets (or messing around with magnets or time spent messing with magnets) are needed. :)
I've quenched a large butcher knife where only the thinner hollow ground part had gone through the arrest point and it turned out real good. :)
But then the back square edges of it couldn't be used to sharpen sorry factory made knives. ;)
Doggonit I didn't scan the graph showing the basis for my "arrest point method" and it's been over a year since I've been able to scan stuff. :/
Alvin in AZ ps- unsubscribed to rec.knives
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