I want to learn how to make knifes.

On Sun, 12 Sep 2004 22:22:51 GMT, "TomNBanderaTx"


That is a very good book. I talked our local library into getting a copy because the $50 price tag scared me off, but now I can say that even at full price it's well worth it. I have gone through it so many times. I've almost worn that copy out myself.
Another good reference is "How to Make Knives" by Richard W. Barney, Robert W. Loveless
Another thing you can do is subscribe to both "Blade" and " Knives Illustrated " magazines, a wealth of info in almost every issue.
Bear
PS: Don't get discouraged when you find that very many books contradict each other, there are many different ways do do most anything, the main thing is to use the method that works best for you, taking in, your experience level, the kind of materials you are working with and what the job is for the tool you are making.
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Hardly ever get to do this... :) I got mine used for $4 plus shipping through Amazon. :) No kidding, it is like new. Whipped you by $3... well that'll about do it for me for a couple more years... I'll just have to relish the sweetness of that $3. ;)
Wasn't after that book was a after "on food and cooking" by McGee to give away to a friend.

You're kidding right? :)
The $50 is how much the "knife shop" will cost you, not the book's price.
You were kidding right? :/

Good one! :)
Just used something I saw in a picture the other day while tapering the tang on a kitchen knife I'm making from 50100-B. Bob L's knife has a "hollow grind" in the handle so while flattening it out, only the edges of the wide surface is in contact with the belt... in my case tho- first the hand grinder's depressed center wheel (type 27) and then a very coarse, large, double cut (flat) file.
No fancy belt grinders and $#!% like that around here! :/

Sure enough. :)
Alvin in AZ
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Hey Al, I done some reading :) YES I CAN READ :)
Cold work the snot out of that bandsaw blade stuff and give a report please.
Les
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snipped-for-privacy@nowhere.net wrote:

Ok. :) Did you find something on the internet? Heck, I'm a new member of ASM... I need to search there! ;)
Alvin in AZ (ASM's number 1 usenet parrot)
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On 13-Sep-2004, snipped-for-privacy@XX.com wrote:

Yes, most of what I found has .3 to .45 carbon in it. If what you have has low carbon heat treat will not work. But cold working should, I think, maybe :) I am thinking cold forging the cutting edge down untill you see spliting, then grinding just enough to remove the splits.
I am also interested in using it for damascus blades.
Also, as a side note, have you tried M42 steel for blades? I see 2 inch endmills on ebay, they would be large enough to get a few blades from.
Les
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Hmmmm...
Also it's curved, so maybe a guy could beat it straight and not heat treat it at all? :) Didn't think of that before now. :)
I cut off several foot long pieces and clamped them in between some angle iron and heated the whole works up to about 1200F for an hour or so, sealed up the furnace and let it cool.
All I know about it is--> they are straight :) ...don't know more than that. :/

I gave some away to several guys back when I was on the "knife-list". None of them could get it to weld.
The analysis for it can be found here- http://www.panix.com/~alvinj/testsamples.htm

Being a desert rat I don't know what an end mill is (not much industry here). I was given an HSS mill cutter (what's it called?) that looks like a circular saw blade and am in the process of making a leather skiver from it-
http://www.panix.com/~alvinj/skiver1.jpg
Cool cracks huh? ;)
I don't know how to spark test HSS other than to separate moly types from pure tungsten types. It's not a pure tungsten type (T#). All I can tell it sparks like something in between M42 and M2.
The cool thing about M2 at 64-65hrc is mostly in the comparison with any ordinary knife blades out there, even my extra hard ~66hrc 1095 and 50100-B ones are no match for the stuff. :)
So, M42 at 69-70hrc would be cool to try out. :)
Alvin in AZ
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On Mon, 13 Sep 2004 19:18:07 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@XX.com wrote:

I was kidding about the price tag scaring me off, but not about talking the libraiy into getting a copy then re-reading it so many times I've almost worn the library's copy out. Why buy it myself and lose the damn thing at home so I can't find it when I need it if they will get it and keep it where I can find it if I let other people read it too once in a while? It pays to get to know the librarians they can be most helpful ;o)

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