Re: power hammer

charles wrote:


I haven't seen one, but it's probably feasible. You'll have to fab a frame to hold the hammer, and it'll need to be fairly massive to absorb the recoil. Remember that the mechanism will be exposed to intense radiant heat from the workpiece, and think about shielding for the electrical bits and any component made of plastic. The only street pounder I've used ran on air, so I have no idea whether the unit shown in the foto is 'throttleable' or not. If it is, then you'll have to come up with some sort of linkage to the trigger that you can operate with your foot, because you'll need both hands to control the work unless you have forearms like Popeye. Powerhammers can snatch the work right out of the tongs if you're not careful. You'll need a clear area around the hammer, because it Will Throw flux EVERYWHERE. 2500 degrees is H-O-T, and it will start fires in combustible materials like shop rags, wooden workbenches, the motorcycle in the corner... Let us know how it comes out.
Charly
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When building a powered forging hammer consider this first:
"Force,equals Mass, times, Velocity squared"
Electric demos hammers use a small diameter,very light weight,internal hammer,(2-3lbs) going very fast. These hammers are light weight and work great at punching POINTED tools through concrete. A hammer designed for forging hot iron bars has a HEAVY hammer moving somewhat, slower. In this case mass will always win out over speed. The diferences between an electric demolition hammer and a metal forging hammer are really pretty extreme You coulde probably use the electric for a dandy sheet/light plate hammer but if you think you can hammer hot iron 1/2" or higher your anvil will be laughing at many broken hammers.
Glen G. in Steel City
charles wrote:

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