Chopsaw Question

What are those big fan/suction devices that suck all the debris/dust from abrasive blades into a filter?
I don't know what they're called. My local metal supply place has one,
but no one there seems to know either.
thanks in advance,
K. Gringioni (ignorant)
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Cyclone or cyclonic dust collector. Grinding collectors do not generally use a filter or a bag. They use various methods to dump out the burning grinding particles. Some use water baths, others use baffling, others use fast and slow air changes.
Burning sparks and filters/bags are not a good thing. Many the person who has used his shop vac for this has set it..and or his shop afire.
Gunner
"If thy pride is sorely vexed when others disparage your offering, be as lamb's wool is to cold rain and the Gore-tex of Odin's raiment is to gullshit in the gale, for thy angst shall vex them not at all. Yea, they shall scorn thee all the more. Rejoice in sharing what you have to share without expectation of adoration, knowing that sharing your treasure does not diminish your treasure but enriches it."
- Onni 1:33
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If you are using a chopsaw I'd suggest you save the money you'd spend on the dust collector and sell the chop saw. Then get a cold saw. When I looked at the fact that a day of cutting with the chop saw took 3 days to deburr the cold saw started to look really good. You know what? It was good too.
Gary H. Lucas
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Gary H. Lucas wrote:

What sort of cold saw?
We have a Milwaukee 14 inch for aluminum. It worked fine for steel and stainless steel, but those blades were expensive and the teeth didn't last. Additionally, they didn't work well for small pieces - the teeth would catch and fling the small pieces. The chopsaw works better for us for small pieces, but ya, the deburring is a problem.
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A cold saw for ferrous metal spins a 14" blade at 30 to 45 RPM. My last two were Taiwanese SOCO saws, not bad for the money. They all have a vice which holds both sides of the part being cut. So you can SAFELY cut a part in half, that was only half an inch long to start with! This is essentially a milling operation, and you get a finish consistent with milling. They almost all have a flood coolant system. I put a simple vernier stop on mine, using a 1/2-20 threaded rod and a nut with index marks. The first piece I cut will be over by about 0.015" so I don't waste it. The next one, and all the rest will be within +- 0.002". My SOCO was intended for ferrous, but I cut mostly aluminum, just a little slower than your Milwaukee, but a hell of a lot safer, and far more accurate and clean. I liked the fact that I didn't have to think twice about removing 1/4" from the last piece of a bar safely. We also routinely cut 20 spacers say 3/16" long off a 2" round bar.
The blade is high speed steel with no inserts typically. To cut a wide range of material thicknesses you need at least 3 different blade pitches. Too fine and the gullet packs up, BANG the blade cracks and you throw it away. Too coarse and you may catch a single tooth and break it off. The blades get resharpened for about $12 and can be resharpened many times. When the teeth get too small they charge you an extra $10 to grind off all the teeth and grind in new ones on a smaller diameter. You keep going until you run out of diameter. Realistically you need to have at least 6 blades, a spare for each of the 3 pitches. For production you need 9, 3 out getting sharpened. This is important, a dull blade doesn't just cut poorly, it sometimes goes BANG and cracks so you throw it away.
A cold saw cuts accurately and cleanly enough that for many parts you won't need to square up both ends of the part. This saves a huge amount of money. On thin tubing you can get a cut so clean there will be virtually no burr. We used to cut tons of thin wall tubing, and the burr free parts saved us 3 times the labor cost of making the cuts. At that time I had an automatic feed SOCO. Put a 20 ft bar in there and come back later to get the number of parts you set on a counter. It easily held +- 0.001" on length over 100 pieces.
Hope this helps,
Gary H. Lucas
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I bought our shop a cold saw about 18 months ago. It was fully automatic, but the control was missing. It is up and running now, and we just ran a couple production jobs on it last week.
This model is for non-ferrous metals only. It has a blade that is 16" in diameter. The blade runs at a speed that to me is absolutely frightening. Surface speed like a woodshop table saw. It was blasting through 3-3/4" aluminum round bar, the saw time was on the order of 3 seconds. It has an issue we need to look into where the length of index could be more accurate, but even with a total deviation of about .030", it still is suitable for our needs.
Loud? dayumm. I use a set of ear muffs I bought for the pistol range, with something like 32db reduction.
I'd really like to have one of those smaller manually operated units for short runs in smaller bar sizes.

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The speed of your saw is probably quite a bit below the speed of a wood cutting saw. Wood cutting saws typically turn about 5,000 rpm, I'll bet yours is turning about 3,000. However compared to a ferrous saw at a leisurely 45 rpm, yeah it is a bit scary! The ferrous saws are very quiet, about the same as a horizontal bandsaw.
Gary H. Lucas
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Gary H. Lucas wrote:

That helps quite a bit - I'm going to look into one of those.
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Depending on the job you could include coolant or whatever elese ...
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