Here are the EV cars, crushed

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Evcrushed.jpg
The first generation EV1s used lead-acid batteries in 1996 (as model
year 1997) and a second generation batch with nickel metal hydride batteries in 1999. Some of the Gen 1 EV1's were refurbished and upgraded to Panasonic Lead Acid batteries.
The Gen 1 cars got 55 to 75 miles (90 to 120 km) per charge with the Delco-manufactured lead-acid batteries, 75 to 100 miles (120 to 160 km) with the Gen 2 Panasonic lead-acid batteries, and 75 to 150 miles (120 to 240 km) per charge with Gen 2 Ovonic nickel-metal hydride batteries. Recharging took as much as eight hours for a full charge (although one could get an 80% charge in two to three hours).[9] The battery pack consisted of 26 12-volt lead-acid batteries holding 67.4 MJ (18.7 kWh) of energy or 26 13.2-volt nickel-metal hydride batteries which held 95.1 MJ (26.4 kWh) of energy.
A modified EV1 prototype set a land speed record for production electric vehicles of 183 mph (295 km/h) in 1994. [edit]
Consumer Experience
The process of obtaining an EV1 was difficult. The vehicle could not be purchased outright. Instead, General Motors offered a closed-end lease for three years, with no renewal or residual purchase options. The EV1 was only available from specialist Saturn dealerships, and only in California.
Before reviewing leasing options, a potential lessee would be taken through a 'pre-qualification' process in order to learn how the EV1 was different from other vehicles. Next came a waiting list with no scheduled delivery date. After two to six months, the lessee would be allotted a vehicle. Installation of a home charger took one to two weeks.
Once past these hassles, the EV1 driving and ownership experience was unlike a conventional petrol or diesel vehicle. The EV1 had the lowest wind resistance of any production vehicle in history, with a Cd of 0.195, while typical production cars have Cd's in the 0.3 to 0.4 range.[10] As a result, at highway speeds, the only audible noise was often the steady thrum of the tires, with nothing from wind or motors. At lower speeds, and at stoplights, there was no noise at all, save for a slight whine from the single-speed gear reduction unit. The EV1 could accelerate from 0-60mph in the 8 second range. Top speed was limited to 80 MPH, though the EV1's propulsion system and aerodynamic shape were theoretically capable of 190 MPH with modified gearing. Speed, range, and various other numbers were displayed by digital readouts spanning a thin curved strip just under the windshield and well above the dashboard.
The home charging installation was about 1.5'x2'x5' with integrated heatsinks and resembled a gasoline pump. Charging itself was entirely inductive, and accomplished by placing a plastic paddle in the front port of the EV1.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/General_Motors_EV1#Consumer_Experience
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Well it should have had a low Cd. It had a srim belly pan that was produced by the company I worked for at the time. We sure lost our butt on that one.
Wes S
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