Shark Clamps

To All:
    We've all used Kant-Twist clamps, where on the larger sizes if you've got to move them from near full open to near full closed you have to
stand there and spin the screw for what seems like *DAYS*. <g>
    It seems Carr-Lane has added a new trick push button that speeds up the process.
http://tinyurl.com/7c7wpd
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BottleBob
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Clever addition to a good tool. I usually grab a clamp by the handle and shake it so the clamp spins while the screw stays stationary.
Fred
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ff wrote:

Fred:
    Yeah I'm sure we've all done that, in fact that's what I do when walking from the clamp drawer back to the machine. But I think a one finger spin of the "T" handle is a little quicker.     I've thought about making a sort of yoke adapter for my electric screwdriver to speed up the process. BUT, that's just one of MANY projects that weren't a top priority - so never got done.
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wrote:

Ive got some 12" or 14" Kant Twists that have an interuppted thread, turn 90' and move them to where you want them, then tighten.
Unfortunately they are stripped out in the nut area.
When I find a new supply of Round Toits, Ill bore and sleeve em.
Gunner
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wrote in message

Well, you know yer not sposed to do that with a micrometer, right?
I think they just put a plain ol split nut on there -- you can find vises with these, but I believe they make the vise/clamp inherently weaker. Neat idea, tho.
But I think a one

I have a 3/8 sq drive to hex adapter, put this in a "close quarter" right angle drill, and spin my lathe chuck up and down. Mostly just for the hell of it.... :) But, for jaw reversal, frequent large-to-small diams, etc, quite the time/wrist saver.
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Mr. PV'd

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Proctologically Violated wrote:

PV:
    Yeah, supposedly too much wear from side loading, plus if the measuring faces contact - the momentum of the spinning frame can spring the contact faces open. I don't know how much force it would take to permanently distort the frame, but why take the chance.     But I think it's faster to roll it up your arm anyway (which "theoretically" imparts some small degree of side loading as well).     If you want the micrometer equivalent of a "Shark Clamp", (well not exactly - but faster than a regular micrometer), see here:
http://www.mitutoyo.com/pdf/1930QuantuMike.pdf
    It "sounds" good, but I'd have to use one and check the "feel" against corresponding measurement accuracy.
    Has anyone bought, or used, one of these puppies yet?
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BottleBob wrote:

Bob, Haven't used one of the Mitutoyo mics, but I have an Etalon 0-1" Microrapid mic. Mic advances .100 per rev. The tenths are still very readable, and because it's Etalon the quality and feel are excellent.
I also have an Etalon mic that advances .050 per rev.
Etalon no longer makes them in inch units, only metric IIRC.
Love those Etalon mics!
Best, Steve
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Steve Saling
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wrote in message

I haven't used that one yet but I own one of these - http://www.mitutoyo.com/TerminalMerchandisingGroup.aspx?group 88
It moves 10mm per thimble rev, so it's quicker than the Quantu but less accurate at +/- 0.0001" vs. +/- 0.00005"
I love it. Especially when I have a turned part with a fast cycle time and multiple diameters to be measured. I had a customer bring one to a run off and after using it I decided to buy one. Until I saw the price. So, I bided my time and watched Ebay and finally scored one listed improperly along with a poor picture. I snagged it for $125.00 and if it's wasn't new it sure wasn't far from it.
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Dan

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D Murphy wrote:

Dan:
    .400 per revolution? That's a LOT. Can you tell a "feel" difference between that one and a regular micrometer?
    On general principle I don't buy used precision instruments like an indicator or micrometer. You can get some real deals, but you never know if the item was dropped or crashed.
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wrote in

Wherever any of our inspection tools will no longer pass certification then time to take them down to the local pawn shop...
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wrote in

It has a friction thimble that is integral to using it. There really isn't much feel involved. The mechanism inside it is different than a regular "screw" type micrometer. If you are measuring a shaft and you tilt the shaft while it's in the anvils, the spindle will push back and the reading will change. If anything you want the part and mike to feel stabilized.

I sent it out to be checked out and certified since I figured this would get used for run offs and machine acceptance. So given the extra cost I was still well under half price of new. I've bought a number of used measuring instruments on Ebay and only got scorched on a 1-2 inch pin mike. I knew it had condition problems but I figured I could fix it up. It turned out that I couldn't. It was bent. But no big deal for what I paid for it. Plus it kept me busy one Saturday. It's the kind of thing that would come in handy about once every two years, so I can't see buying a new one as being worth it.
I would never buy something like gage blocks unless they were for shop use. But micrometers and indicators can usually be repaired and brought back into calibration. I bought a very expensive mitutoyo digital indicator cheap. It needed repair and it turned out to simply be some loose screws inside. It has worked perfectly for several years now. I intended to send it out for repair if I couldn't fix it but it was a simple fix.
I've repaired a number of clockworks type indicators over the years. There really isn't anything to it. You just need to be patient and careful. Any parts I've bought have been reasonable compared to new.
Service techs are a great source for free damaged DTI's. Invariably they drop them, crunch them, or drown them in coolant. All easily fixed. They will usually toss them out and buy another one.
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Dan



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Yah, but what about all the shitheads you hire to do things like screw on a kant twist for 10 minutes strait all thru the day? Jeesh man, that could cost our trade 3 million jobs!
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