Spinning Video

Here is a video of a spinning machine we recently finished .
http://s32.photobucket.com/albums/d1/debco99/?action=view&current=Spinvid.flv
The second one for the same company will be completed in a few weeks.
Slightly interesting if you havn't seen one working.
Best Daveb
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DaveB wrote:

Interesting! Very sophisticated! We have done a few parabola dish antennas spin on the lathe to a mold, 20" dia or so. JS
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Dave,
Thanks for the video, it is very interesting.
Tom
(DaveB) wrote:

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Thanks for checking it out.
Regards Daveb
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<DaveB> wrote in message

Dave, I used to buy spun aluminum sheaves from a company called Bomco. The sheaves were quite complex. I think they needed 7 tools to make one. I would bet they have CNC machines, maybe yours. I later designed a larger sheave of my own that was made in two mirrored pieces bolted together and required two tools. A company called Landergren in Minn. made them for me. No CNC there for sure. Interesting process though I've never it done in person.
Gary H. Lucas
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On Sat, 22 Jul 2006 01:56:23 GMT, "Gary H. Lucas"

We have done a few tool changer spinning machines, the one in the video is a 5 station tool changer.
We are currently gearing up to do one that spins 12 ft dia.
Regards Daveb
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<DaveB> wrote in message

Dave, Showing my ignorance here. I thought the part you spin against is the tool. They needed 7 of those. Would those be changed out automatically?
Gary H. Lucas
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On Sat, 22 Jul 2006 20:52:33 GMT, "Gary H. Lucas"

Hello Gary,
You are correct the tooling in this case is the part you spin against.
It goes by various names "Chuck" Preform,Tooling, what I was talking about is the machine has a 5 station tool changer, guess you could call em a "Roller Magazine"
This way you can use various diameter rollers, different radius rollers as well as turning tools.
Best Daveb
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Very nice!!
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wrote:

Thanks Daveb
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DaveB wrote:

Dave:
    Pretty darn cool. So is the forming "roller" driven or freewheeling? The "roller" obviously moves in Z and X but I couldn't tell if it's axis moved radially in the ZX plane. I don't know if I'm being very clear here. Let me ask it this way, how many axes of movement does the machine possess? And how is it programmed? Is there such a thing as a "spinning" CAM system?
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wrote:

This machine is basically a 2 axis lathe, the "X" is on long slots in the table that allows the slide to be aligned on any angle.
The roller is freewheeling.
The machine can be programmed offline with a cam system or at the machine with a method called " Record/Playback "
The machines with a pc front end have the option of CAM system (Esprit)
Record playback is the best method, as you never really know how the material is going to react.
If you look in the video you see the back wheel come in on the backside of the part this is to prevent the material from bottlecapping or getting deformed at the edges.
There is always some trail and error in making any parts.
When using joysticks to record you basically make the desired spinning passes and the control records position data at a rate you can preset. (memory allocation) As you can imagine this takes a huge amount of memory.
As you are recording you press a "Pause Button" and then press the desired aux. function such as Spindle On, Ejector Out, Tailstock in, etc.
The M code is then placed in the real time recording, some machines have as many as 5 aux. slides for additinal forming operations.
A lot of it depends if you are free spinning or forming over tooling.
Since almost all spinning machines use hydraulic servos, pressures must be momitored and controlled by transducers to prevent some unpleasent problems.
Best Daveb
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(DaveB) wrote in

Dave,
Very cool. Thanks for putting it out there.
Are the axes electric servo motor and ball screw? How much axis thrust does something like that need?
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Hi Dan,
This machine has hydraulic servo's both X and Z, I would think the force can be as high as 60Kn.
The second machine we are finishing up is hydraulic in X and a servo motor (electric) on Z (quite a large one).
The problem of course with that combination is trying to get matching servo loops as far as gain and response.
Hydraulics have come a long way over the years, if you watched the machine run you would never know its hydraulic.
The joysticks for the record function are hall effect, while recording you lock the X axis joystick towards the part and control the feedrate with a pot that has zero in the center(bi-directional).
With your other had you control the Zaxis direction
First you trace your tooling, this becomes a safety boundry, you monitor the pressure at this stage to keep very light pressure while the roller is in contact with the tooling.
The tooling profile is shown in graphics so you can see your toolpaths in relation to the finish profile.
Then you enter the materail thickness and start recording the spin passes.
It is something that takes a lot of time to get the touch to make good parts.
What would take me all day most good spinners can do in about 15 minutes.
Best Daveb
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(DaveB) wrote in

Yeah, but they probably can't build the machine.
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Cool! I especially like the girl in the red shirt.
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On 22 Jul 2006 13:55:09 GMT, alphonso

Lol can you see the whole photo album?
Best
Daveb
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Yes, the other pics of the machine are nice, too.
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On 22 Jul 2006 22:47:32 GMT, alphonso

LMAO way funny
Best Daveb
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DaveB wrote:

Dave:
    Is that you with the chicks? LOL
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