When to give up on the 4x6 horz'l bandsaw?

Awl --
How do you know when to junk it, and just get another one?
I've had two main problems: Blade tracking (jumping off the wheels), and
wildly non-vertical cuts.
Now, I know the blade tracking can be adjusted by a kind of camber screw on
the top wheel, and that the blade guides can be rotated for cut
perpendicularity, but neither of these seem to be helping.
The blade wheels don't seem to be worn, altho I'm not sure if the blade
surface of those wheels is supposed to be exactly parallel to the rotation
axis, or have a slight rake toward the back flange, to help keep the blade
on the wheel.
Would it be useful to put a rake on this face, on the lathe?
Next, how much play in the blade guide bearings is acceptable? The ones I
replaced had very little play, but replacing them seemed to solve the
problem.
Now, the perspicacious amongst 4x6 owners will be asking:
Wtf did MOI get replacement parts from ????
Ahhhh, li'l Grasshoppers......
My machine tool supplier had literally dozens of these saws (and their
"sister" drill presses) in various states of return, and one month I just
scavenged zillions of parts, so that I could in fact make complete saws.
Plus I didn't sweat any of the small stuff, like those bullshit guards,
protectors, stands, wheels, I just threw alladat shit out.
If you want a nice stand, spend $50 on one of them wheeled/shelved wire
carts from Sams/Costco.... good rolling cart, with good storage. I
actually have TWO 4x6's mounted side by side on one of these carts, one for
alum, one for steel -- vastly reduced belt/blade changing, you really get
spoiled by this, AND your blades last a lot longer.
But, the Q remains: If one does not have that type of parts bonanza (which
moi no longer has), just how DO you get parts??
You can find all kinds of help/tips for these saws, but no real parts
source. Which suggests that this is, essentially, a throw-away tool, after
a while.
I wonder how many sep. factories there are for this tool, in Taiwan/China,
because some saws seem to be made a bit better than others. Is there a
known outlet for the better saws?? I can't imagine it would be
effingHF.....
I essentially gave up on these saws, let them sit for about 2 years, since I
do little steel cutting these days, and discovered the RAS for aluminum,
even 3" bar.
But, the RAS can requires some testosterone (and boucou ear plugs), and I'm
running low on the former. Plus, tough to use the RAS at 3 a.m.....
But on a massive cleanup of the shop, I decided to take care of bidness, but
still, the problems were curious in their intractability, and I don't know
if brute-force parts replacement was the best solution, altho it appears to
be A solution.
I like the tip about an oil drip, for the blade. I made a pretty
sophisticated (well, at least for THIS saw) recirculating coolant
system/stand, which eventually got stolen (a left handed compliment, if
there ever was one), but realize that the oil drip idear may be a lot more
practical. Inyone done this?
Idears, experiences, war stories on repairs??
Reply to
Existential Angst
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Got a gear shaft (the one between the lower pulley wheel and the brass worm gear) you want to get rid of? Mine snapped just past the bearings.
Jon
Reply to
Jon Danniken
I have a 1989 Delta 4x6 which was well made and cuts square. Someone didn't like it because I bought it from a pawn shop for ~$120 in the mid 1990's.
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
The worm gear/shaft attaches to the stepped belt pulley. That can't be removed, at least not by me -- wonder how they got that in there, cuz the worm gear is not pinned to the shaft. I don't think that worm gear is brass.
The shaft for the blade pulley connects to a "regular" brass gear. I got a cupla of those (shaft+brass gear) in varying conditions. Those can be pounded out, altho in pounding them back in, not sure how that will affect seals, etc.
Reply to
Existential Angst
This guy use to be a lawyer. The detail he goes into is painful at times to watch but if you really want a serious understanding of how to tune and modify a bandsaw it's worth it. His DVD is almost 8 hours of beyond anal retentive information exclusively on bandsaws.
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Nice site, guy seems to really enjoy his craft. The rec.woodworking peeple would proly appreciate this as well. I have to post my home-moaners travails of spray painting over there (HF pressurized paint pot), I'll give them the link.
Reply to
Existential Angst
Is the spares back up from the suppliers poor in the US? When I needed a new worm and wheel for my 4x6 here in the UK I just went and asked the supplier MachineMart
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and they had them in stock and I had the new items in a couple of days for about £17 total which I thought was very reasonable. That was about 7 years ago and the saw was about 7 years old at the time and the parts fitted fine. When I first got the saw the worm and wheel mesh was very tight and had to be adjusted and at sometime subsequently moved again and eventually wore the wheel badly, I suspect as the tops of the worm teeth were very sharp. I fitted 4 new ball bearings to support the bits as at least one of the originals had a bore about 0.005" over size so not a good fit with the shaft. On the few occasions I have gone to MachineMart for spares they have always had them in stock and delivered quickly so might be an option although shipping to the US would add some to the final price.
Reply to
David Billington
Chicom bandsaws are of "variable quality". Shrug
Some will work very nicely..others..need serious tweaking. Which is the reason I have (2) Emerson 7x12s and a bigger Spartan saw.
There are many good online sources for data on tweaking these saws.
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Hunt..and ye shall find the answers to the Universe!!
Gunner
The methodology of the left has always been:
1. Lie 2. Repeat the lie as many times as possible 3. Have as many people repeat the lie as often as possible 4. Eventually, the uninformed believe the lie 5. The lie will then be made into some form oflaw 6. Then everyone must conform to the lie
Reply to
Gunner
"Existential Angst" wrote in news:50ba480f$0$1222$ snipped-for-privacy@cv.net:
How did you fare from Sandy? I figured your basement would be completely underwater.
Reply to
Alphonso
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Reply to
PrecisionmachinisT
Ah, you are correct, it has been a few months since mine went south.
Funny thing about it is that the hole drilled for the pin is off-center; I don't know if they are all off center, or if it just depends on who is running the drill press that day:
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Jon
Reply to
Jon Danniken
Thanks for the tip, David. I bought mine from an outfit called Harbor Freight, and I'm pretty sure they don't have parts available.
Nice to know there is at least one place that still does that!
Jon
Reply to
Jon Danniken
I have a larger hobby size - 7x11 with fluid spray and hydrologic feed. I put a hydrologic oil filter - a Parker on the flow tube and it extends the life of the blades and improves the cut as well. I have a nice M42 blade for it, but the carbon blade keeps cutting and cutting. I finally broke some teeth off it and replaced it with the last carbon. Figured I'd keep the M42 tip for a special use or a later day.
The parker filter happens to be a common one and the oil in the oil bath soaked the paper within and lasted and lasted. I finally rusted it when the mix got old and watered down to much. That took 8 or 9 years just like the last carbon blade. I have two more filters in the cabinet.
Martin
Reply to
Martin Eastburn
Hey, nice of you to ask, but no, I'm on a hill, bone dry. I lose power all the time, which is why I'm x'ing off the days on my calendar until my 15,000 W nat gas genset arrives.... Didn't lose power during Sandy, but since I bit my fingernails to the quick, I figger next time, with a genset, I at least won't have to bandage all 10 digits... LOL
Said hill, however, means I can't get to my house when it snows.... :(
Reply to
Existential Angst
Indeed, under Customer Svc, they have a Parts Dept.... what a revolutionary concept.... altho over here, Sears always had a good parts network, for their stuff.
In terms of wear in the gearbox, sometimes these saws are shipped almost bone-dry, with a shitty li'l dollop of grease, that can't poss. get to the gear teeth or bearings.
So what I do -- which may not be the best application of lubrication science, but it beats a dry gear box -- I put in gobs of axle grease, a gob of lithium grease, and *fill* the box with 20W-50 or gear oil.
Filling the whole box with oil also makes sure the bearings stay lubed, as well. Everyone with a 4x6 should pop the cover off, and fill up that gear box.
Reply to
Existential Angst
Regarding parts from Harbor Freight: I have never been disappointed when I needed parts from them. -Simply go to their website. -Search for the item you have -Somewhere on that page will be a link to the "Manual". -Open it up and you will find the parts list toward the back of the manual -Locate and write down the numbers of the parts you need. -Write down the model number of the product. -Call Harbor Freight tech support (or customer service if you can't find the tech support number) and tell them what you want to order.
You will be surprised at the wide variety of parts that they do have in stock. Sometimes, though, I have had to wait several weeks for a part, but they tell you that up front. This can happen when you need a part that isn't normally called for.
I don't work for HF, and I do realize that you get what you pay for. HF works for me, with the above in mind.
Now, here's my dirty little HF-as-a-parts-source secret: Since the Chinese rip off many, many tool designs, the parts they use are often exact copies of the original designs. I go there to get parts for the original machines when the price for a "real one" is 'way too high for me. Example: I needed a 12" long tool rest for an old Delta wood lathe. Ebay price for a used one was about $50, if you could find one. HF has a similar size lathe, obviously very cheaply made, but with a cast iron tool rest, just like the original. I copied down the model number, went home and looked up the manual. Price brand new: $7.00!
Pete Stanaitis ---------------
Reply to
Pete S
NEVER MIX different types of grease!
lithium added too most others equals crud / rock that jams whatever you were trying to lube
For many years I had a customer with a machine I serviced in their lab.. they had a large chart on the wall with details of whats compatible.
lithium isnt compatible with much of anything,,,,,,
Reply to
bob haller
[snip]
Thanks for that information, Pete, I wouldn't have guessed that they were able to order parts. I'll give them a jingle tomorrow and see what they have to say.
Jon
Reply to
Jon Danniken
Great info.
Reply to
Existential Angst
Hmmm.... I'll check the box in a cupla days, report back. Fort'ly, the dollop of lithium grease wadn't as big as any of the other dollops.... lol
Reply to
Existential Angst
Actually Harbor Freight is pretty good about supplying parts. They have been known to strip parts from a brand new good machine to make sure the customer is taken care of. Parts that make the brand new machine no longer usable to any degree.
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Gunner
The methodology of the left has always been:
1. Lie 2. Repeat the lie as many times as possible 3. Have as many people repeat the lie as often as possible 4. Eventually, the uninformed believe the lie 5. The lie will then be made into some form oflaw 6. Then everyone must conform to the lie
Reply to
Gunner

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