After the background of Control Theory

Hi, I am a student in Electrical-Electronics Engineering. I got all the Control courses as:
- control theory - process control
- process instrumentation and control - digital control systems
I want to continue my profession in Control systems. Now i would like to join to an internship program for 1 year in the USA with a student program. I would like to ask you;
****1- How can I find a company which is related with control systems? Where can I apply? Because it is hard to find in this specialization.
2- What softwares (simulation) do I need to know for profession?
3- What is the importance of GPA while being accepted to a company as an internship student?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
seryuz wrote:

Look at product lines that seem to need control systems expertise; think creatively. Most groups that aren't selling control hardware yet still have control engineers on staff have maybe 1 control engineer for every dozen or two other flavors of engineer; many smaller companies don't have anyone who specializes in control, rather they'll have folks who do control as part of their job, and they'll hire consultants when they need them (or well after they needed them).
Companies that I can think of that would have control engineers on staff would be: printer manufacturers, semiconductor processing equipment manufacturers (but they're in gloom and doom mode right now), automotive companies (engine management, transmission management, antilock breaks, airbag controls, ...). There are probably more. Defense contractors will have control engineers on staff, but if you're not a US citizen your range of divisions that you could work for is severely curtailed -- but it wouldn't hurt to check.

If a company looks at anything it'll look to see if you know Matlab/Simulink. Personally, I'd be much more interested in knowing that you understand the basic theory; without a theoretical background using a simulation tool is like sitting in a mud puddle and paddling your hands -- it's fun, but it's unproductive and messy.
The thing that'll give you the best chance of being hired is to have experience turning your pretty little Matlab algorithms into code that'll work in C or C++. Yes, Matlab can do this for you, and yes, many companies will send a boatload of cash off to the Mathworks for the toolbox that does it. But some old-timers (like me) view this method of generating code with a jaundiced eye, and you'll never generate tight code that's a good match for your processor this way.

That depends on the company. A GPA will help to get you by HR, and will be impressive up to a point when you interview with the engineering staff. Many engineers are leery of a guy with a perfect 4.0 GPA -- a 3.8 GPA means you're smart and effective. A 4.0 GPA could mean that you're smart and effective, or it could mean that you can memorize books and regurgitate them onto exam sheets without understanding them, or it could mean that you're an 'A' level brown noser, or it could mean that you went to a school that really isn't very good at all. (note that I got a 4.0 in my Master's program. I like to think that it's because I'm smart and effective, but who knows?).
--

Tim Wescott
Wescott Design Services
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tim Wescott wrote:

(snip)
And do something practical with all that theory! Few companies are looking for math slingers -- they're looking for people who can make their machines work.
If you're still working on your educational program do projects; if you aren't then highlight any project work -- even in-class -- on your resumes!
--

Tim Wescott
Wescott Design Services
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.