Moldable Iron Powder

On Mon, 30 Nov 2009 22:09:40 -0800, Gunner Asch wrote:

[Cats are liberals]

Um, better hurry up! ;-)
Cheers! Rich
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about Mon, 30 Nov 2009 22:09:40 -0800 did write/type or cause to appear in rec.crafts.metalworking the following:

    Cat's aren't liberals. Cats just recall when they worshipped as gods. Which they still believe was only right and proper.     I'd say today, they're more absolute monarchists. And the only ones who matter are other members of the aristocracy.     But I still like the fuzz balls. - pyotr filipivich We will drink no whiskey before its nine. It's eight fifty eight. Close enough!
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On Tue, 01 Dec 2009 15:35:19 -0800, pyotr filipivich

As do I.
So the sig stays!
Gunner, with Fughead the kitten, curled up in his lap.

"Aren't cats Libertarian? They just want to be left alone. I think our dog is a Democrat, as he is always looking for a handout" Unknown Usnet Poster
Heh, heh, I'm pretty sure my dog is a liberal - he has no balls. Keyton
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I dunno about the ability to meet your requirements, but there are iron powders available for various uses, from toys (Etch-A-Sketch), to industrial uses.. electromagnetic clutches/brakes for machines. These examples are moderately coarse powders.
Very fine iron/steel particles are a byproduct of etching/cleaning or pickling steel products in manufacturing. The steel parts are pickled in various acids, and the particles which are suspended in the liquids are then filtered to remove the particles from the acids. The result is a mud/clay-like material that is used to manufacture other products, including iron composition cores for certain magnetic properties.
I don't have any sources to recommend.
--
WB
.........
metalworking projects
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The finest iron powders are called "carbonyl iron" (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carbonyl_iron ).
Googling for carbonyl iron brought up this supplier: <http://www.chemicalstore.com/navigation/detail.asp?id=IRON100 .
Joe Gwinn

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Wild_Bill wrote:

Many years ago, the ferrite factory for which I worked used oxide from the steel mills as a raw material. I was told there were mountains of the stuff in West Virginia. To be usable for magnetics, the oxide would have to be fired in a cycle that included high temperatures and witchcraft.
Kevin Gallimore
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Zone refine. Melted in a magnetic field and the field is moved slowly towards an end - moving impurities with it.
Expensive refining but quality product. Similar to that of a semiconductor process. Likely from the ferrite business.
Martin
axolotl wrote:

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    --Hey speaking of doing stuff with metal powders have you seen Bathsheba's process description yet? http://www.bathsheba.com/sculpt/process/
--
"Steamboat Ed" Haas : Currently broke and
Hacking the Trailing Edge! : looking for a job...
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and a further reply - iron powders are used in spray-metal applications but at a price
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