220 volt line to 120 plugin?

Hi - I am fairly unfamiliar with electrical concepts, but here is my question. Im my bathroom is a standard 220 volt baseboard heater
installed by the previous owner. It is in a terrible position as the length of it sits just 2 inches from a permanent large wood base of a tub he put in. It gets very hot and seems dangerous. I want to remove the heater and if at all possible, place on the wall where the heater was (there is a junction box coming out of the wall next to the heater now) a standard 120 volt plugin so I can use a timered radiator-type freestanding heater i already own.
Is it possible to somehow allow a 120 volt device to be plugged into a 220 line? Convert or something else? Thank you, Heather
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Ther short answer is yes you can convert that to a 120v outlet. The safest way is to call an electrician.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

The baseboard heaters I am familar with use 2 wire cable plus a ground wiire, no neutral. There is no reason I know of why the existing wires can not be used to wire a 120 circuit using one of the wires as a neutral. This would mean chaging the breaker in your service panel to single pole 20 amp and connecting 1 of the wires to the neutral bus. Not a very difficult task if you know what you are doing. If you dont then call an electrician.
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Last time I checked, the code allowed just one GFCI outlet in bathrooms for things like hair dryers, electric toothbrushes, and shavers.
A convenience outlet that close to your bathtub may be illegal and dangerous as the authorities don't really want you to be running portable appliances near bathtubs and showers.
Beachcomber
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You can have all the GFCI protected receptales you want but you are correct in pointing out the GFCI.

This may change in 2008 but right now they only say it can't be in the "tub space". It can be just outside the shower curtain.
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On Fri, 27 Oct 2006 21:22:32 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

You can have all the GFCI protected receptales you want but you are correct in pointing out the GFCI.

This may change in 2008 but right now they only say it can't be in the "tub space". It can be just outside the shower curtain.
Thanks all for the answers. I really appreciate your help. After figuring out if it was even possible, I planned on calling an electrician so it was done right. Hopefully they'll clue me in on the local codes if any apply to placement. Thanks again, H
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I once stayed in a well known motel chain in Madison, Wisconsin. The light switch for the overhead bathroom light was literally "in" the shower on a tile wall. I was amazed and amused, but thankfully not "shocked".
Beachcomber
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