Question with 277V volt lighting

I have a building that has 277V fluorescent lighting. I no long have the 277V available. Can I still use the same ballast and bulbs just hook the
120V up to it or do I need to change the 277V ballast to 120V ballast and the bulbs. I looked at the bulbs and there is no voltage ratting on them so I am assuming they will work 120 or 277 V is this correct? Any one on what I will need to do to make this work for the now 120V circuit?
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so
I
A building that had 277v and now does not? That is pretty strange. You will need to buy all new ballasts for the fixtures for the new source voltage of 120v. Lamps are fine
I would be extremely concerned about the equipment that originally installed. A fair amount of the rotating equipment may not be dual voltage.
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|
| |> I have a building that has 277V fluorescent lighting. I no long have the |> 277V available. Can I still use the same ballast and bulbs just hook the |> 120V up to it or do I need to change the 277V ballast to 120V ballast and |> the bulbs. I looked at the bulbs and there is no voltage ratting on them | so |> I am assuming they will work 120 or 277 V is this correct? Any one on what | I |> will need to do to make this work for the now 120V circuit? | | A building that had 277v and now does not? That is pretty strange. You will | need to buy all new ballasts for the fixtures for the new source voltage of | 120v. Lamps are fine
Sometimes when buildings get converted from commercial use to residential, such as lofts made from old warehouses, the power company gets all snotty and won't let you have the cool voltages at 277 and up anymore, and makes you have to put up with the lame 240/120 everyone else has. I'd rather have 600Y/347 but that's very rare in the US. Even 240Y/139 is more common.
If this is a case of a comercial building staying commercial and getting stuck with 240/120 or 208Y/120 when it had 480Y/277 or such, then it does sound fishy.
| I would be extremely concerned about the equipment that originally | installed. A fair amount of the rotating equipment may not be dual voltage.
Definitely.
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common.
Well, I would rather not want to mess with a bunch of transformers around the place to give the 120/240 that the inexpensive appliances lap up.
The original poster can TRY to run his lights on 240 volts. There is a fair chance it will work. The next step would be a "buck/boost" transformer. I suspect he isn't the only one with the problem and the local supply houses have the transformers in stock.
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so
I
Some electronic ballasts can be wired either 120 volt or 277 volt. Read the labels on the ballasts.
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It may be cheaper to change the fixtures instead of the ballasts in the ones you have. Check the price of new fixtures against the cost of new ballasts and the labor of replacing the ballast. Also check the price of new fixtures with lamps ( they are cheaper with fixtures ) If you go to T-5 lamps you'll get more light for less energy.

so
I
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B J Cornner has shed some valuable common sense on the problem. Makers of fluorescent fixtures buy an obscene amount of ballasts for production. The original poster cannot possibly buy the ballasts cheaply enough to make the conversion feasible. Then you have the labor cost of replacing every ballast. Buy new fixtures specific for your voltage. Sell you old fixtures to someone who will have the need.

so
I
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One more thing. You may have to recircuit the whole place. Fixtures at 277volts draw less than half the current the same fixture will at 120. If you have switches that were swtiching 16 amp at 277 volts you will need two of them now. If as I noted you go to T-5s you can configure the switching to save energy.

and
what
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| One more thing. You may have to recircuit the whole place. Fixtures at | 277volts draw less than half the current the same fixture will at 120. If | you have switches that were swtiching 16 amp at 277 volts you will need two | of them now. If as I noted you go to T-5s you can configure the switching | to save energy.
Or get a transformer and use genuine 277 volts.
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Have you priced transformers lately? With the price of aluminum, copper and steel on the rise it will be cheaper to get new fixtures than a transformer and new wiring.
wrote: | One more thing. You may have to recircuit the whole place. Fixtures at | 277volts draw less than half the current the same fixture will at 120. If | you have switches that were swtiching 16 amp at 277 volts you will need two | of them now. If as I noted you go to T-5s you can configure the switching | to save energy.
Or get a transformer and use genuine 277 volts.
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Not really related: I noticed the acceptible voltage range of a replacement computer power supply when in 240V mode, went as high as 275 volts. I thought "almost but not quite good enough to be plugged into a 277V wall outlet." That made me wonder: Is there such a thing as a low current (15 or 20A) 277 volt single phase standard outlet? Not that there would be hardly any need for it.
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On Tue, 25 May 2004 04:05:47 +0000 (UTC) Michael Moroney
| Not really related: I noticed the acceptible voltage range of a | replacement computer power supply when in 240V mode, went as high as | 275 volts. I thought "almost but not quite good enough to be plugged | into a 277V wall outlet." That made me wonder: Is there such a thing as | a low current (15 or 20A) 277 volt single phase standard outlet? Not that | there would be hardly any need for it.
NEMA 7-15R
See page A-28 of: http://www.hubbell-wiring.com/library/Section-A.pdf
Running computer power supplies on higher voltages shortens their current pulse times, creating more harmonics. Since 277 volts would be phase to neutral, this would put a heavy triple load on the neutral if a lot of these were wired up on 277 volts.
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snipped-for-privacy@ipal.net writes:

Should have guessed that.

BTW, while googling 7-15R I found something even more obscure, NEMA 24-15R. 347V single phase 15A (24-20R 20A). See: http://www.leviton.com/sections/techsupp/nema.htm or http://www.sun-birdelectrical.com/northamerican.html
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On Tue, 25 May 2004 17:12:00 +0000 (UTC) Michael Moroney
| snipped-for-privacy@ipal.net writes: | |>On Tue, 25 May 2004 04:05:47 +0000 (UTC) Michael Moroney
| |>| Not really related: I noticed the acceptible voltage range of a |>| replacement computer power supply when in 240V mode, went as high as |>| 275 volts. I thought "almost but not quite good enough to be plugged |>| into a 277V wall outlet." That made me wonder: Is there such a thing as |>| a low current (15 or 20A) 277 volt single phase standard outlet? Not that |>| there would be hardly any need for it. | |>NEMA 7-15R | | Should have guessed that. | |>See page A-28 of: http://www.hubbell-wiring.com/library/Section-A.pdf | | BTW, while googling 7-15R I found something even more obscure, NEMA 24-15R. | 347V single phase 15A (24-20R 20A). See: | http://www.leviton.com/sections/techsupp/nema.htm or | http://www.sun-birdelectrical.com/northamerican.html
There is also 24-30R and 24-50R for 30A and 50A. Also a locking (twist and lock) version is defined for L24-20R, which has a really funny looking center tab on one of the blades.
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There are uses for them. I'm using 12 of them for my HID lights, makes changing out the fixture real easy, just unplug them and unhook them from the I bolts and you can service them on the ground.
William.....
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And your not the only one. There in most of the "big Box" stores like Costco, Fred Meyer, Home Depot etc.
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (BJ Conner) writes:

Interesting. I'll have to look next time I'm there.
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