110 volt vs. 220 Volt

I know nothing about electricity and I need to buy a new ventless stackable Washer/Dryer. I was told that I have 110 volt outlet that would need to be upgraded to 220 volt install a new W/D. While looking online I notice that many of these units say that they use 120 volt. Will I be okay to run a 120volt w/d with my existing outlet?

Thank you, Gina

Reply to
ginahowell
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In the US, clothes dryers including stackables almost always require an individual 220/110 to 240/120 volt outlet. The higher voltage is used for the dryer heating element. The lower voltage is used for the dryer motor. Sorry, but you probably will have to have a 30 ampere dryer outlet installed for 220/110 volts in your case.

Reply to
Gerald Newton

Yes, if it is a gas dryer. No, if it is all electric.

Ed

Reply to
ehsjr

Well I'm no Electrician;-) but Yes'.

You will have to upgrade the circuit behind the W/D to 220/30Amps, as well as your outlet.

Now if you have a #10 wire (rated for 30Amps) in that 110 excisting outlet, it won't be that difficult to disconnect the circuit wires and put them on a 220/30A circuit breaker (connecting both white & black wires to it) and re-install them with the proper Rated 30 Amp 220 Receptacle at the Applicance end. I've done it dozens of times for AC's.

220 volt appliances do not need a neutral connection..if the box is metalic & the cable is BX or metal armoured cables the metals will make for a safe earth connection ....
Reply to
Tick Tock

Having the white wire connected as an ungrounded conductor is dangerous, and violates the NEC in the US (I am not sure where the original poster is from). You can't tape wires that size, so pull a new red wire instead.

Ben Miller

Reply to
Ben Miller

From: snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com I know nothing about electricity and I need to buy a new ventless stackable Washer/Dryer. I was told that I have 110 volt outlet that would need to be upgraded to 220 volt to install a new W/D. While looking online I notice that many of these units say that they use 120 volt. Will I be okay to run a 120volt w/d with my existing outlet? Thank you, Gina

Gina: In retrospect: You can Plug & Run the 120volt W/D in the excisting outlet with no trouble at all - IF you bought the 220volt version you would then have to get the outlet upgraded.

-------------------->

Mr. Miller: with all due respect ~ No-One would run a single red coded wire (even in the US) for this application unless the circuit was piped inside the wall - If it's in Old BX Armoured Cable Run (most likely) then need be by the NEC = the whole outlet to be rewired with a HomeRun to the Distribution Panel....with the proper breaker & 3 conductor cable., red/black (taped white) & green for grounding.... (or) [employ the method I've already described] (tick tock)

Reply to
Tick Tock

Huh!

It's routine to run 240 circuits using 2 wire (+ ground) cable.

According to the "rules" you are supposed to make the WHITE wire black or red (with a marker or tape) but most "professionals" don't bother and most inspectors don't seem to care.

Why? Because it doesn't present a risk to folks who know what they are doing. When you open a J box that has a switch, for example, you don't expect the WHITE wire to really be neutral. When you disconnect a cable from your 240 water heater you don't expect the white wire to be neutral. When you disconnect a cable from a 240 outlet without a neutral, you don't expect the WHITE wire to be neutral.

Reply to
John Gilmer

I was saying to add a red wire, or replace an unused white wire with a red wire, in an existing conduit. If it is Romex or BX, then see your next suggestion.

If it's in Old BX Armoured Cable Run (most likely)

Good idea, and the proper way to do it.

You don't "convert" a 120 volt circuit to 240 volts. You replace it, including proper wire colors. Think about the person who services this circuit 5 or 10 years from now, and assumes that the white wire is grounded, and therefore "safe" to touch. Or, what if someone reconnects it or taps into it for a 120 volt receptacle for another purpose (black & white=

120volts, as we all know)? Don't assume that the typical do-it-yourself homeowner is as knowledgeable as a professional electrician, and would pick up on the dual breaker, the live white conductor, etc. They might not ever look inside the breaker panel.

Ben Miller

Reply to
Ben Miller

You are confusing common practice with Code compliance. Look at the NEC Code requirements in 200.7. Other than a few specific exceptions, white insulation is reserved for a grounded conductor. If it is in a prefab cable assembly and you permanently change the color everywhere that it is accessible and visible, then you can use it as an ungrounded conductor, as it is no longer considered a white wire. The original response by Tick Tock just talked about reconnecting the white wire to a breaker, not changing the color, which was my objection. You also seem to advocate that.

See my previous posting regarding homeowners.

When you open a J box that has a switch, for example, you don't

Yes, you should. White wire should NOT be used as an ungrounded conductor to a switch. If there is one in the box, it should be a grounded conductor. There is a Code allowance for using the white conductor in cables on the supply side of 3-way or 4-way switches, but that now requires coloring the insulation. In the past, this wasn't necessary.

According to the Code, you SHOULD expect that! You and I might not, based on our knowledge and what we observe, but what about an average homeowner who dabbles with his own electrical work? You can see what the level of knowledge is by the questions that routinely appear on this group from do-it-yourself electricians.

Ben Miller

Reply to
Ben Miller

I don't "advocate" anything. I merely point out the practice.

Well, they have to learn. Maybe the hard way.

What about a 2 wire "switch loop?"

Again, they will learn!

>
Reply to
John Gilmer

From: (John=A0Gilmer) Having the white wire connected as an ungrounded conductor is dangerous, and violates the NEC in the US (I am not sure where the original poster is from). You can't tape wires that size, so pull a new red wire instead. Huh!

It's routine to run 240 circuits using 2 wire (+ ground) cable.

According to the "rules" you are supposed to make the WHITE wire black or red (with a marker or tape) but most "professionals" don't bother and most inspectors don't seem to care. Why? =A0 Because it doesn't present a risk to folks who know what they are doing. =A0 When you open a J box that has a switch, for example, you don't expect the WHITE wire to really be neutral. =A0 When you disconnect a cable from your 240 water heater you don't expect the white wire to be neutral. When you disconnect a cable from a 240 outlet without a neutral, you don't expect the WHITE wire to be neutral.

REPLY : I usually tape it - I learned from my first conversion to leave it marked (Hot Too) with black or red tape for anyone with good knowledge but poor intuition of household circuitry.... And the fact that one should remove the Receptacle First before powering the circuit back on IS VERY IMPORTANT - someone may plug a 110 device in the interim and Poof !! back to Target for a new one :-) Tick Tock

Reply to
Tick Tock

From:(Ben=A0Miller)

"Tick Tock" wrote Mr. Miller: with all due respect ~ No-One would run a single red coded wire (even in the US) for this application unless the circuit was piped inside the wall I was saying to add a red wire, or replace an unused white wire with a red wire, in an existing conduit. If it is Romex or BX, then see your next suggestion. =A0=A0If it's in Old BX Armoured Cable Run (most likely) then need be by the NEC =3D the whole outlet to be rewired with a HomeRun to the Distribution Panel Good idea, and the proper way to do it. You don't "convert" a 120 volt circuit to 240 volts. You replace it, including proper wire colors. Think about the person who services this circuit 5 or 10 years from now, and assumes that the white wire is grounded, and therefore "safe" to touch. Or, what if someone reconnects it or taps into it for a 120 volt receptacle for another purpose (black & white=3D 120volts, as we all know)? Don't assume that the typical do-it-yourself homeowner is as knowledgeable as a professional electrician, and would pick up on the dual breaker, the live white conductor, etc. They might not ever look inside the breaker panel. Ben Miller

Reply to
Tick Tock

(John=A0Gilmer)

You are confusing common practice with Code compliance. Look at the NEC Code requirements in 200.7. Other than a few specific exceptions, white insulation is reserved for a grounded conductor. If it is in a prefab cable assembly and you permanently change the color everywhere that it is accessible and visible, then you can use it as an ungrounded conductor, as it is no longer considered a white wire. The original response by Tick Tock just talked about reconnecting the white wire to a breaker, not changing the color, which was my objection. You also seem to advocate that.

I don't "advocate" anything. =A0 I merely point out the practice.

Why? =A0 Because it doesn't present a risk to folks who know what they are doing. See my previous posting regarding homeowners.

Well, they have to learn. =A0 Maybe the hard way.

=A0=A0=A0=A0When you open a J box that has a switch, for example, you don't expect the WHITE wire to really be neutral.

Yes, you should. White wire should NOT be used as an ungrounded conductor to a switch. If there is one in the box, it should be a grounded conductor.

There is a Code allowance for using the white conductor in cables on the supply side of 3-way or 4-way switches, but that now requires coloring the insulation. In the past, this wasn't necessary. What about a 2 wire "switch loop?"

When you disconnect a cable from your 240 water heater you don't expect the white wire to be neutral. When you disconnect a cable from a 240 outlet without a neutral, you don't expect the WHITE wire to be neutral. According to the Code, you SHOULD expect that! You and I might not, based on our knowledge and what we observe, but what about an average homeowner who dabbles with his own electrical work? You can see what the level of knowledge is by the questions that routinely appear on this group from do-it-yourself electricians.

Again, they will learn!

REPLY: I never said anything against color coding the white conductor - See Here - Practicality Need Not be Hazardous No One should assume that a Skilled Electrical Craftsman would leave Anything to Chance to a Consumer that has Contracted Him to Apply His given Electrical Expertiese for the benefit of his Familiy or Households Convenience...It's just Not Good Practice - & I advocate leaving it well open to interpretation for the next guy 5 - 10 weeks or years from now...

I Never Assume anyhting with Circuits & I Always Cross The Tester on All Conductors Before servicing them ..... no mater how simplistic the measure applicable.

  • Sometimes you are all just Insulting or your insulation has worn to thin with electron movement :-) Tick Tock
Reply to
Tick Tock

Gina, If you want a straight answer don't ask a bunch of engineers. They tend to over-analyze everything. (Too much information) Simply ask an Electrical Contractor who's been doing it for several years. Usually those small portable stacked units are 110V for apartments and in the worst case it should be dedicated 110V receptacle and you can easily within

30 minutes, convert it to 220V by using the white wire as a hot. MAKE SURE WHITE WIRE IS NOT SHARED ANYWHERE ELSE! Yes, just for the heck of it, mark both ends black and stick her on a breaker and go dry those clothes!

Mike R Electrical Contractor Northern California

Reply to
MLR

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