Battery suggestion

Any suggestion on how to build a battery from household material able to
power up an LED for a school project? ( Very preferable without caustic
chemicals).
Thanks,
Reply to
A371C
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For just an LED? You might try nickels, pennys, tissue paper and very salty water. You just have to figure out the right way to stack them together ;-)
daestrom
Reply to
daestrom
did National semi not give demos with oranges? I remeber some of these reps went around to give demos of low current devices. used 3 or four oranges connected together to provide enough power to run a micro. rw
Reply to
Rein Wiehler
> > Any suggestion on how to build a battery from household material able to > power up an LED for a school project? ( Very preferable without caustic > chemicals). > Thanks, > > -- > Rudy > > ---> Beware the man of one book!
Reply to
ehsjr
I appreciate all the suggestions, but I am afraid that they will not work. I should have specified what type of LED. White LED: forward voltage 3.6V @20mA. BTW I am not the student, but I was a student just 50 years ago!
Reply to
A371C
| | I appreciate all the suggestions, but I am afraid that they will not | work. I should have specified what type of LED. White LED: forward | voltage 3.6V @20mA. BTW I am not the student, but I was a student just | 50 years ago! | |
Two dissimilar pieces of metal plate (coins) pushed into fruit (orange, lemon), wire several in series to produce more voltage.
Reply to
Harry Bloomfield
> I appreciate all the suggestions, but I am afraid that they will not > work. I should have specified what type of LED. White LED: forward > voltage 3.6V @20mA. BTW I am not the student, but I was a student just > 50 years ago! > -- > Rudy > > ---> Beware the man of one book!
Reply to
daestrom
Of course they'll work. Add 'em up in series to get the required voltage.
I should have specified what type of LED. White LED: forward
Reply to
ehsjr
Caustic chemicals are the best part of batteries. I don't think you can actually *have* a battery without caustic chemicals.
OK, strictly speaking, sulfuric acid isn't caustic, it's acidic...but you didn't want to just avoid lye, did you?
As a demo in high school chem I took some lead flashing, cut it into strips, stuck it into a 250 ml beaker full of dilute sulfuric acid, charged it for a while, and then connected it to a 2 V pilot lamp which lit quite nicely. You'd need at least two in series for a white LED - probably 3. And it's a rechargeable battery, too.
Bill
caustic
Reply to
Bill Shymanski
"Caustic" doesn't mean reactive.
Indeed. OTOH, NiMH batteries are fairly benign. One can safely throw them in the land-fill.
Car batteries are rather similar. ;-)
Reply to
Keith R. Williams
[or acidic] chemicals.
Sure you can. An Aluminium/Air cell uses salt water as it's electrolyte. Sea water works fine.
Reply to
Guy Macon
Hmmm...ok. But I bet sea water causes more corrosion than any other substance on Earth!
Bill
Reply to
Bill Shymanski
No problem. Take one of those compartmentalized plastic boxes with molded in partitions (each area holds water without leaking to the others).
Get some aluminum and copper flashing material. Cut the metal into rectangles or squares so that they fit down into the compartments and protrude ~1/2" or so.
Punch matching holes in both metals where they extend above the compartments and use some machine screws and nuts to fasten them. So you have tiny sheets of copper and aluminum fastened together at one end (a crimp, fold, or sometimes the punched hole will be enough to make a connection but a bolt lasts longer)
Slide the prepared plates of the battery into a pair of compartments over the partitioning plastic so that you have aluminum in one copper in the other and each compartment has both.
Fill compartments with electrolyte (lemon juice, salt water, or other weak electrolyte) Connect end plates to the LED. We powered a simple three transistor radio with one cell back in the days of germanium point contact transistors. I think we were getting about .5 volts per cell in the multiple batteries. I never measured the current output.
Try different electrolytes Lemon juice or vinegar work well.
Reply to
default
Not really. Oxygen causes more corrosion than any other substance on Earth. And don't get me started on Dihydrogen Monoxide, the Invisible Killer...
(Note to the humor impaired: please consider the possibilitly that Bill and I are just having some fun here before firing up the flamethrower...)
Reply to
Guy Macon
Dihydrogen Monoxide, please! I spit on your Dihydrogen Monoxide. Hydrogen Hydroxide is clearly the often unseen killer.
"Firing up the flamethrower." Hmm, that's certainly a clear mental picture.
Reply to
Keith R. Williams
Conspiracy! "They" want you to believe that Dihydrogen Monoxide is the killer, when there are *Billions* of dollars made on Hydrogen Hydroxide.
Reply to
Keith R. Williams
Hydrogen Hydroxide is your friend!
Perhaps you've heard of it: a colorless, odorless liquid; a powerful coolant and solvent; an easily- synthesized compound which is used by industry, the military, commercial operations, and even private individuals.
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Hydrogen hydroxide is benign!
The Coalition and others have popularized the label "dihydrogen monoxide" over the more chemically-accurate "hydrogen hydroxide" because they know how loaded the former name is. "Monoxide" has become synonymous with pollution, toxic gases, industrial waste-- and while hydrogen hydroxide is sometimes a factor in these problems facing our world today, it is rarely the dangerous element.
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Reply to
Guy Macon
Hmm, this seems all too familiar. De Ja Vu, all over again?
Reply to
Keith R. Williams

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