GFCI again



Bill, an inductive kick can generate broadband RF. The RF can then activate the trip function in the GFI circuit. Kind of a false alarm in a way.
The kind of GFI used for hot tubs seems like it would be best for this application.
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Interesting though. If so, that would explain why a capacitor helps. I would also expect that removing the ground should not greatly affect the action of rf on the circuitry.
Bill
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An old man would be better off never having been born.

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wrote:

It clamps the HF transients.
When testing the PARD of a power supply, it is often common to place a 10uF EL cap plus a 0.01uF ceramic across the output being tested.
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wrote:

If you can, try changing the motor switch to a solid state relay.
Have you tried MOV's across the line?
I had a problem with a certain type of power strip. This one had a neon indicator from hot to ground (to indicate proper wiring) it was enough to trip out the protection built in to an inverter.
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A thyristor switch could be handy. It could allow lagging inductive current to continue to flow until zero current causes the thyristor to become nonconducting. But what I am using is a cheap Harbor Freight timer that allows any time on.off schedule in 15 minute combinations.
Bill
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