How would you wire GFCI in ceiling?

Inspector told me I need my outlets for lights and future garage door
opener in the ceiling GFCI protected. My 100 amp panel I bought comes
with 4 20 amp breakers as well as the 100 amp main breaker.
Obviously installign GCI outlets in the ceiling is out because if they
trip I would have to get a ladder to reset it.
Probably the best thing to do is to go and buy some GFCI breakers.
I also have the option on at least one circuit to install a GFCI
outlet along the wall and wire that to the ceiling outlets. But this
seems like it is not the "right" way to do it. Someone other than me
might not figure out if the ceilign outlets tripped, where to reset
them?
What would you do?
Reply to
stryped
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In article , stryped wrote:
I would take the last option and just have some extra wall outlets,
Bill
Reply to
Salmon Egg
It is common practice to use GFCI receptacles to protect what is downstream from them. A major reason is that GFCI receptacles are much cheaper than GFCI breakers.
Reply to
bud--
I would just make the switch box a 2-gang and install a GFI outlet along with a switch in there. Come off the load side of the GFI to feed the switch and your lighting circuit is GFI protected. The advantages to doing it this way is, your means of reset is right next to your switch, a GFI outlet is about 1/3 the cost of a GFI breaker, you get an additional convenience outlet, and finally you can run 3-wire out of the panel to your circuits. When using a GFI breaker you must use 2-wire or it will not work correctly.
Reply to
Rich.
y.- Hide quoted text -
That is an excellent idea! I appreciate that!
Reply to
stryped
I like GFCI breakers personally, but there's nothing wrong with using a wall outlet to protect the ceiling outlets. My house was built in '79 and a single GFCI outlet in the garage protects those in each of the three bathrooms and out on the back deck. The circuit runs all over the house.
Reply to
James Sweet
New construction you need a separate 20A circuit for bathrooms now. For 3 bathrooms the circuit would just be for the receptacles.
Reply to
bud--
I'm just the opposite, I prefer the outlets over the breakers, so that the reset is right there with you. I also don't use the feed-through feature on a GFI unless all of the receptacles are in the same room. There's nothing worse than tripping the bathroom GFI then having to wrap a towel around yourself to go down to the basement and reset it. As luck would have it, it's most likely to happen when your daughter has friends over for a slumber party.
Reply to
Rich.
I'm aware of that, I certainly wouldn't do it today like mine was done, but it was once standard practice. My point was simply that the GFCI location is not always obvious, but you figure out where it is and then it's not a big deal.
I do wonder how many people out there in houses like mine have been putting up with dead receptacles in the bathrooms for years, not realizing that there's a GFCI hidden behind all the junk they have stacked in the garage.
Reply to
James Sweet

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