Is this a bad idea? WIll electrical inspector fail this?


I am using T8 "shop lights in the ceilign of my detached garage.
ABout10 of them. They are the type with a cord and plug.
I am putting an outlet for each light in the ceilign and planed on
having everythign protected by a 20 amp GFCI breaker.
Will the inspector say that that is a problem because if the breaker
trips, I will have no lights? I have the back 6 lights installed, I
could still buy the 4 remaining in a non plug in variety and wire to a
separate non GFCI circuit.
To be honest I currently have the six lights I have installed running
on an extension cord to my GFCI outlet at the house and it has never
triped the GFCI. I need the plug in lights so I can work in there at
night and to be honest they are pretty handy to move around. They are
also cheaper than the non corded types.
Reply to
stryped
Loading thread data ...
Don't you have to be licensed to even think about having an inspection?
Perhaps you are -- ?
Reply to
mkr5000
Where I live a home owner can do his own electrical.
Reply to
stryped
How in the world do you expect any of us to know what the inspector is going to say? If you want to know what the inspector thinks of it, ASK THE INSPECTOR.
Reply to
Doug Miller
snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) fired this volley in news:h7jb1m$kuc$ snipped-for-privacy@news.eternal-september.org:
And if you want to know what to say to the inspector, buy a damned code- check book, and use your own brain, instead of ours.
LLoyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
personally I would split them between two breakers so I don't end up in the dark. Or at least have one light on a differant breaker, or you could go the battery powered emergency light.
Thank You, Randy
Remove 333 from email address to reply.
Reply to
Randy
Is a code-check book something other than one of the NEC summaries on the market?
Reply to
Joe Pfeiffer
Where are you? What code is in force there? Is this your own residence or a commercial facility?
Generally, in the USA (covered by the NEC), there is no requirement for emergency lighting in residential installations.
That said, its a good idea to have your lights in a circuit separate from tools (as it seems you are doing). If something should go wrong whilst operating some machinery and trip the breaker, the last place I'd like to be at that point is in the dark. Looking at this the other way around, if your general lighting circuit should go out, a work light nearby would be good to have on the equipment circuit. Its even worse to be arounb rotating machinery in the dark.
Reply to
Paul Hovnanian P.E.
Joe Pfeiffer fired this volley in news: snipped-for-privacy@babs.wb.pfeifferfamily.net:
They have that sort, and also regionalized and state variations.
Although every county in every state will tell you "we're different", I've found that if you adhere to the NEC (except on commercial work), they will pretty much accept it as-is. For commercial work, almost every jurisdiction has some of its own "tweaks" that are more stringent than the national code.
LLoyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
Just call the local inspector's office and ask them. It's a pretty simple question and I'm sure they'd be happy to point you in the right direction.
Reply to
Fester Bestertester
That's because they are generally inferior, particularly the ballasts.
Reply to
ATP*
ide quoted text -
Ok, I think I will put the lights on two different breakers. However, if I use a GFCI breaker, and one of these light circuits also goes to an outside security light, will this outside light be more likely to cause the circuit breaker to trip? (The GFCI I mean)?
Reply to
stryped
Ok, I think I will put the lights on two different breakers. However, if I use a GFCI breaker, and one of these light circuits also goes to an outside security light, will this outside light be more likely to cause the circuit breaker to trip? (The GFCI I mean)?
Not if it's a good light and the seals remain tight.
Reply to
ATP*
Why are we GFI protecting lights on the ceiling to begin with? Or is this required where you are?
I'm told the new 2010 NEC will require GFCI and arc fault on every circuit in the house.
Thank You, Randy
Remove 333 from email address to reply.
Reply to
Randy

PolyTech Forum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.