Is this a bad idea, will inspector have a problem?

I am using T8 "shop lights in the ceilign of my detached garage. ABout10 of them. They are the type with a cord and plug.
I am putting an outlet for each light in the ceilign and planed on having everythign protected by a 20 amp GFCI breaker.
Will the inspector say that that is a problem because if the breaker trips, I will have no lights? I have the back 6 lights installed, I could still buy the 4 remaining in a non plug in variety and wire to a separate non GFCI circuit.
To be honest I currently have the six lights I have installed running on an extension cord to my GFCI outlet at the house and it has never triped the GFCI. I need the plug in lights so I can work in there at night and to be honest they are pretty handy to move around. They are also cheaper than the non corded types.
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stryped wrote:

It is code compliant. Ask the inspector.

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The problem you could have with the inspector is whether or not he allows a ceiling receptacle to be installed that isn't a twist-lock.
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Is that a code violation?
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I think it is but I can't find it in the book, so I'm not committing either way until I can find the answer. But I do recall something about ceiling receptacle needing to be twist lock instead of straight blade so that the plug can't fall out.
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Rich. wrote:

Funny, garage door openers around here have the simple 15A plug/receptacle setup and inspectors don't seem to mind that (as long as it's GFCI'd)
daestrom
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If the plug falls out, then it is dangling and whether it is within reach or not- it is dead. Why would it require a GFCI breakerÉ (and why do I see an accented E insted of a question markÉ). I have such a ceiling outlet and it is not on a GFCI breaker- however,different code requirements are likely.
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:If the plug falls out, then it is dangling and whether it is within reach or :not- it is dead. Why would it require a GFCI breaker (and why do I see an :accented E insted of a question mark). I have such a ceiling outlet and it :is not on a GFCI breaker- however,different code requirements are likely. :--
I would imagine that because the outlet "might" be used for other than the intended purpose, a potential hazard to the person plugging in some other device, remains. If the outlet is not easily accessible (ie. it is in the ceiling space) then the requirement for a GFCI circuit may not apply. Nevertheless, I would regard it as good practice to use a GFCI wherever a pluggable circuit is installed.
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wrote:

I see the garage door metal as being the issue. You have the opener connected to the center guide, the center guide is connected to the door (especially a metal door), the door's rollers go into the metal tracks. The potential is there for current to travel from the opener motor all the way to the door tracks. If someone has their hand on the tracks or the metal door, they can end up being a path to ground.
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wrote:

-- If the plug is out of the socket- there is no electrical connection to the parts of the door. In the case that the plug is in place and is a 3 prong plug, then the design of the opener is such that the chassis of the opener is grounded. The drive, at least in my opener. (made by a reputable firm) is through non-conductive gears (and this cost me $$ as the gears wore down- giving me a mess of plastic `sawdust`` ). I suggest that the design of such door openers has dealt with the problem of `hot```doors. As for the use of an outlet-in my case it is about 10 feet up, for any purpose, particularly as I have 4 other regular outlets in the garage, makes me think of an old prof`s maxim: `you can make things foolproof but not damfoolproof```
--
Don Kelly
snipped-for-privacy@shawcross.ca
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The retard chose the wrong size opener for his overtly overweight garage door, and he is having trouble grasping the physics of wear.
Instead of buying a unit that is proper for the job, the dope probably actually spent the money to fabricate metallic replacements at a cost that outweighs the entire unit price.
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-- wrote:

The GFCI is for all outlets in the garage, not just the ceiling one. It makes sense on the others, since they may be used to power out-door items, or the garage floor could be wet, or some other hazard.
So I think the code requires them *all* to be GFCI.
I suppose a fault in the opener could otherwise make the door itself 'live' and that would be an obvious hazard. So GFCI all 'round.
daestrom
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Codes can vary. I will have to check the Canadian Electrical Code. My garage outlets are not GFCI but all the outdoor outlets- which I use for outdoor applications are GFCI. The drive support and chain are grounded and the door is wood. The floor is wet only when I choose to wash it.:) The design of the opener precludes making the door "live" .
--
Don Kelly
snipped-for-privacy@shawcross.ca
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You do realize there is no "x" to remove?!
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Oops -must change header information. --

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Rich. wrote:

I've never replied to Don's e-mail, but I've always *assumed* he meant to simply take out the 'cross' ('x', 'cross', get it?)
daestrom
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--
remove the x to reply
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Rich. wrote:

I've never seen a twist lock receptacle in a residential setting. Nearly every garage door opener plugs into a standard 15A duplex receptacle on the ceiling. Does code require otherwise now?
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I'm not positive but it's starting to look like a twist lock is not required. I do a lot of work off of plans and specs. so it's possible I'm remembering reading that twist locks were required in the specs., and not in the code. I found a discussion on this subject among a group of inspectors. One of which claimed to have contacted UL for clarification. Starting at post #13 is where claims of a 3 pound weight limit are made and the discussion seems to get resolved. http://www.inspectionnews.net/home_inspection/electrical-systems-home-inspection-commercial-inspection/13740-receptacle-outlet-mounted-ceiling.html
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I'd ask your local code enforcement; plug-in ceiling lights could easily be considered permanent fixtures, which would disallow the plugs & wires.
Twayne`
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