Is this product a rip-off? It's at least a good laugh.

I saw this product at a web site. It converts "110" volts to "220" volts. There are 3300 watt models and 4400 watt models. What I was curious about
is just what kind of plug was used to get power and what amperage it was rated for. Since very few people would have the typical high current 30 or 40 amp receptacles, I wondered how useful this would be. So I looked around ... and finally found it ... and laughed out loud when I did.
It uses TWO "110" volt plugs. It has a green indicator light that lights up when you find "two independent outlets". Then it can convert the "110" volts to "220" volts using patented technology.
http://www.quick220.com /
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They are sure making a nice buck on these. It looks like about $10 worth of materials retail. They go for $130-210. I notice he saved that pesky "U/L approval" expense ;-)
I guess the firemen will have a good laugh.
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It doesn't really convert anything. Since about half the outlets in 120/240 single phase building are wired to opposite ends of the transformer, this unit brings each hot to the plug for 240 volt operation. The beakers on each 120volt outlet still properly protect the circuit from over current.
In a commercial environment it is possible to plug the device into a two outlets on a separate phase and get the incorrect voltage on the output plug.
Since most large 240 volt appliances use more than the typical 15 or even 20 amp max current the 120 outlets deliver, its usefulness is limited.
I don't know what any codes have to say about such a device. John

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300.20 pretty much blows this device off the market.
300.20 Induced Currents in Metal Enclosures or Metal Raceways. (A) Conductors Grouped Together. Where conductors carrying alternating current are installed in metal enclosures or metal raceways, they shall be arranged so as to avoid heating the surrounding metal by induction. To accomplish this, all phase conductors and, where used, the grounded conductor and all equipment grounding conductors shall be grouped together.
240.20(B) is going to be a problem too when you tie these two circuits together and don't have a common trip on both breakers.
(B) Circuit Breaker as Overcurrent Device. Circuit breakers shall open all ungrounded conductors of the circuit... <with some exceptions that don't apply>
I am still not sure how they get by the problem of having hot plug prongs unless there is a relay in there.
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|>I don't know what any codes have to say about such a device | | 300.20 pretty much blows this device off the market. | | 300.20 Induced Currents in Metal Enclosures or Metal Raceways. | (A) Conductors Grouped Together. Where conductors carrying alternating current | are installed in metal enclosures or metal raceways, they shall be arranged so | as to avoid heating the surrounding metal by induction. To accomplish this, all | phase conductors and, where used, the grounded conductor and all equipment | grounding conductors shall be grouped together. | | 240.20(B) is going to be a problem too when you tie these two circuits together | and don't have a common trip on both breakers. | | (B) Circuit Breaker as Overcurrent Device. Circuit breakers shall open all | ungrounded conductors of the circuit... <with some exceptions that don't apply> | | I am still not sure how they get by the problem of having hot plug prongs | unless there is a relay in there.
I would hope it has a relay to engage the conductors only when everything is in the correct configuration.
I could avoid the 300.20 violation by wiring up a shared neutral circuit to a single receptacle box with a split duplex or two receptacles. But then, I could stick a regular 240 volt receptacle in there cheap enough.
Maybe if the box itself has a overcurrent protection in a way that opens both sides at the same time should there be a fault or overload, then it might avoid 240.20(B). That depends on whether 240.20(B) allows a breaker in that box to do the job.
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If the internal relay only operates when it sees 240v between the input legs it would drop if one of the branch breakers trips but that still doesn't address the inductive heating problem. (assuming the relay is really there)
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There will be induction heating effect, what comes out, has to go back.
Art.

legs it

address
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Oops, I wanted to say: There will NOT be any induction heating effect, what comes out, has to go back in.
Art.

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If it goes out in one circuit and comes back on another you will be heating the metal between those holes.
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what
heating the

Many parts of the country don't have metal raceways for the wiring, just NM. So the only heating would be in the boxes. Now if the receptacle boxes are plastic, you only have the service panel to worry about.
So, how much heating would we get in a service panel with a thirty amp load going out one conductor through a hole in one side, and returning through a second conductor through a hole in the opposite side? Or would side-by-side be worse (less panel metal involved)??
Of course, this *still* doesn't address having independent breakers on the two conductors.
daestrom
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That is a good question. I don't know.
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load
a
side-by-side
I know these threaths do not last very long, but if you have enough patiance, I can get infrared camera and do a little exercise, run the 15 Amps through the metal plate and see the temperature rise, and as well run 15A in and out (field cancelation, just resistive heating in the conductors). I do not have time to get arround it for at least one-two weeks though.
Art.
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wrote:
| Many parts of the country don't have metal raceways for the wiring, just NM. | So the only heating would be in the boxes. Now if the receptacle boxes are | plastic, you only have the service panel to worry about.
And any nearby wires.
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what
heating the

I guess I jumped the gun. What I was looking at is to use this device in the kitchen split receptacle, there would be no induction heating. But if the device is used as it is shown on their website, then you are correct, there will be some induction heating. The question arises: is the amount of heat generated significant enough to worry about it? As per code, yes, what in reality?
Art.
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If you have both phases in the same box, why not save $200 and put in a 6-15r
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (Greg) writes:

speaking of which, I have an interesting fixture. Duplex outlet, top is standard 5-15R, bottom is 6-15R. The hot of the 5-15R is jumpered to one of the hots of the 6-15R the same way the top and bottom of every 5-15R duplex outlet is. Didn't know that was legal.
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As long as the breaker opens both hot legs you can feed line to line and line to neutral loads from a multiwire circuit. The NEC handbook has a picture of that combo receptacle in the section that defines this rule.
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On Sun, 23 May 2004 04:50:42 +0000 (UTC) Michael Moroney
| snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (Greg) writes: | |>If you have both phases in the same box, why not save $200 and put in a 6-15r | | speaking of which, I have an interesting fixture. Duplex outlet, top is | standard 5-15R, bottom is 6-15R. The hot of the 5-15R is jumpered to one | of the hots of the 6-15R the same way the top and bottom of every 5-15R | duplex outlet is. Didn't know that was legal.
Shared neutral circuits are legal (need a 2 pole breaker to be safe), though they are frowned on (I won't allow them in my home unless they terminate in a single box.
Your combination 5-15R + 6-15R is not even a shared neutral, by itself. The neutral wire goes to the 5-15R only; the 6-15R doesn't connect to it at all. But if that circuit did run to another combination like it, but the next 5-15R tapped hot from the other side, then it would be a shared neutral (with respect to the two 5-15R's).
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snipped-for-privacy@ipal.net writes:

Oh. For some reason I thought you couldn't feed a 120V outlet off of a 240V circuit (with shared neutral 120V-only wiring explicitly exempted) as well as rules that 240V supposedly only going to a dedicated outlet, you can't have a string of 5 6-15Rs serving a couple of rooms.
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There are a couple rules about "multiwire" circuits, basically that the neutral can't depend on a device and that if they terminate on a single yoke or serve a 240v load they must have a common trip breaker but other than that they are just circuits like the rest. In fact some could say there are less restrictions since most 240v circuits don't require GFCI protection. The major exception is a circuit feeding a skid pack for a spa.
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