Looking for Memory Tester

Can someone refer me to a make and model of memory tester that would test 144-PIN SODIMM 64Mx64 SYNC 100 memory?
I need to read and write the memory continuously for 24 hours looking for
any ECC errors. I am testing used memory modules that are coming back from the field.
--
Will



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Will wrote:

If you can put them in a computer that has a CD drive, you can use memtest86+.
http://www.memtest.org /
--
Virg Wall

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Yes, but then I am need to buy a computer that takes this kind of memory and turning the notebook into a memory tester. At best it is not very flexible if I need to test other kinds of memory.
--
Will


"VWWall" < snipped-for-privacy@large.invalid> wrote in message
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
| Yes, but then I am need to buy a computer that takes this kind of memory and | turning the notebook into a memory tester. At best it is not very flexible | if I need to test other kinds of memory.
Long ago I was buying some cheap memory at a computer store. The owner was selling memory dirt cheap, about 1/5 the cost of new memory. It was a nice way to get your computer to a higher memory level cheaply. He was selling used memory pulled from dead computers. I watched him taking memory sticks out of one bin, inserting them in a tester for a couple minutes, and putting them in other bins based on success or failure. He said he was having a failure rate of about 30% and sending those for scrap metal recovery, and selling the 70% good as used memory at a deep discount. The ones I bought never failed. But this tester he had (actually about 12 of them) was a fully standalone unit with a power switch right next to the socket.
So I know such things at least used to exist for older memory form factors. This was around 1994.
--
|---------------------------------------/----------------------------------|
| Phil Howard KA9WGN (ka9wgn.ham.org) / Do not send to the address below |
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Will wrote:
"Can someone refer me to a make and model of memory tester that would test 144-PIN SODIMM 64Mx64 SYNC 100 memory? I need to read and write the memory continuously for 24 hours looking for any ECC errors. I am testing used memory modules that are coming back from the field."
Virg replied:
"If you can put them in a computer that has a CD drive, you can use memtest86+. http://www.memtest.org /"
Will replied:
" Yes, but then I am need to buy a computer that takes this kind of memory and turning the notebook into a memory tester. At best it is not very flexible if I need to test other kinds of memory."
~~~~~~~~~~ Here you go:
http://www.pctestpro.com/ramcheck/ramcheck_specifications.pdf http://www.pctestpro.com/ramcheck/ramcheck144_adapter.htm
You will need to confirm that it will support ecc testing of your SODIMMs.
Whether you can justify the cost, I leave to you.
Unless you have lots and lots of these modules being returned*, it's probably going to be more cost effective to simply assume that they are faulty and bin/replace them rather than tie up (expensive) equipment and staff time.
If they test ok, what then? Send them back? That they pass a memory test is no proof that they will work reliably in the field - to do that, you need to recreate the field conditions, or ensure that your test envelope includes those conditions.
A compromise may be to set up an identical rig to the field one and soak them in that. It is ecc memory, so it will report ecc errors.
--
Sue



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Those look fine and cost came in around $1400. I was hoping to find something closer to $500, and used is okay. Maybe the idea of buying a notebook as a dedicated memory tester is not crazy after all. Economies of scale will do strange things I guess.

Understood, and it's a long story, but the important point is that the manufacturer no longer makes the precise part number that was used in the original enclosure. In order to stay true to the original product, we are scavenging old parts rather than identifying a newer replacement with a similar but slightly different spec.

An additional test fixture would cost around $10K, so $500 for a dedicated notebook computer is starting to look good. :)
--
Will



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.