Mag Flow Meter

Overheard two guys discussing flow measurement in a pipe line. One of the guys says "we can't install a mag flow meter in the pipeline because it (the
pipe) is stainless steel". The other guy nodded but looked bemused. I thought to myself, why not? Anybody tell me why a mag flow meter can not be installed in a stainless steel pipeline.
TIA
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I'm pretty sure I have called for mags to be installed in stainless steel pipes before. The flange materials and grounding methods can change with pipe material. I have never heard anyone say it can't be done. What's in the pipe?
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Sewage.

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BIGEYE wrote:

Must be the sewage inside part that turned them off.
--
Joe Leikhim K4SAT
"The RFI-EMI-GUY"
  Click to see the full signature.
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They can. Most industrial mag. flowmeters are in steel lines, carbon steel or stainless - it make no difference. The flowtube (body) liner is non-conducting, e.g. Teflon or ceramic, so the small induced voltage is not shorted out by the pipe and may be sensed by the electrodes set orthogonally to the magnetic field, the latter being DC, AC or pulsed - but that's another story. Cheers, Roger
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