Most "correct" way to draw a battery cell in an electronic circuit diagram?

Hello all!
This might seem like a somewhat frivolous question, but I am trying to find the authoritative way of drawing a battery "cell" in a circuit
diagram.
I found references suggesting that the version with two lines (one longer than the other, and a gap between) is a "cell". More than one of these together is a "battery":
http://www.kpsec.freeuk.com/symbol.htm
Apparently people often use "cell" when they meant "battery"... but I'd like to draw a cell in this case. So I'm only using two lines in my picture.
The next question I have is in regards to whether the shorter line should ideally be *thicker* than the longer one. I see that used fairly often, but not always:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/ks3bitesize/science/images/sci_dia_51.gif
I'd like to mark the positive side with a "+", and I was going to put it to the top right. Then I was going to leave off the "-" on the bottom. Is that just as good as anything else, or is there a favorite amongst EEs?
Thank you for any and all feedback, I know this is a little esoteric and most likely the answer is "it depends...", but if there's a consensus I'd love to know it...
Regards, http://hostilefork.com
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On Thu, 20 Mar 2008 20:21:27 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Just curious, but what alternatives have you seen? I've never seen anything other than the short/long line symbol for a battery. What else is there?
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On Mar 21, 8:05 am, snipped-for-privacy@myhouse.com wrote:

Yes, all the versions have two lines. But if you look at the links in my original posting you can see that sometimes the shorter line is noticeably thicker than the longer line. I believe it was drawn that way on purpose, and I wonder if that has any meaning:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/ks3bitesize/science/images/sci_dia_51.gif
I originally didn't know about the distinction between a "cell" and a "battery"-- I'd seen power sources drawn as alternating groups of short/long lines and also just one pair of lines. So when I found out about that, I began wondering about these other variations.
Regards, http://hostilefork.com
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Hello hostile
You're right about reading too much into this. The universally recognised symbol for your purposes is the two line symbol, one being noticeably longer than the other.
Also I'm with "nospam" on this one I've never seen a wholly different symbolic representation of a cell. I think you've a 'typo' below, one symbol is a cell more than one symbol joined with a dashed line is a battery.
If you wanted to be dead clever you'd draw one symbol for each cell so you could have a drawing with 240 symbols on it for a 480v battery!! The normal accepted method is to abbreviate is with the dashed line (length at your discretion) and get the message about the actual voltage by writing it near to your battery symbol.
Interestingly I've never come across an abbreviated drawing symbol for cells in parallel only for batteries in parallel. Although in industry cells in parallel are quite rare to the point that I've never come across any.
Newsey

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Arse
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On Mon, 24 Mar 2008 14:04:35 -0000, "Porky Taylor"

You are the ass, dumbfuck. To quote 67 lines just for your one liner retarded response. You're a goddamned Usenet idiot.
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wrote:

are you into titwanks young lad ?
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