New Electrical Service Box Question

Hello:
Moved into an older home that has 100 amp service.
Will be hiring an electrician to update it to 150 or 200 amps, but would
like to get some comments and information on how to handle the following problem, before I do so.
The present service box is recessed into an area that does not have the physical room to accept a larger box. Not practical to cut a larger opening there.
However, plenty of room about six feet away.
But, all the wires coming in for the 25 or so circuits do not have the length to make it to a new, six foot distant, location.
What are some options in handling this, please ?
If new extension pieces of wire are just spliced onto the old wires using wire-nuts, these nuts can't be just left dangling in space, can they ?
Or, if they are all packed into the old box (e.g., with the breaker panel removed) it probably violates some codes as to the number of wire nuts in a given volume (or does it ?)
How would / should this type of problem normally be handled ?
Thanks, Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Robert11 wrote:

When your electrician comes in to do the pre-work inspection, he should discuss all these options with you, and let you know what they are.
--Dale
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
<<Moved into an older home that has 100 amp service.
Will be hiring an electrician to update it to 150 or 200 amps, but would like to get some comments and information on how to handle the following problem, before I do so.
The present service box is recessed into an area that does not have the
physical room to accept a larger box. Not practical to cut a larger opening there.
However, plenty of room about six feet away.
But, all the wires coming in for the 25 or so circuits do not have the length to make it to a new, six foot distant, location.
What are some options in handling this, please ?
If new extension pieces of wire are just spliced onto the old wires using wire-nuts, these nuts can't be just left dangling in space, can they ?
Or, if they are all packed into the old box (e.g., with the breaker panel removed) it probably violates some codes as to the number of wire nuts in a given volume (or does it ?) How would / should this type of problem normally be handled ? >>
The old panel can be converted into a junction box. The breaker panel should be removed. The old circuits can be extended to the new panel by splicing in the old panel using wire nuts. A cover is required for the old panel and it must be accessible (cannot be placed behind permanently installed building materials.) A good guide on box fill requirements is: 2 cubic inches for No. 14, 2.25 cubic inches per No. 12, 2.5 cubic inches for No. 10, 3.0 cubic inches for No. 8, and 5.0 cubic inches for No. 6. Where two wires are spliced they are counted as two wires. Also the grounding conductors are all counted as one conductor using the largest wire size. For instance two No. 14's spliced require 4 cubic inches of space in the splice box. More than likely, the panel has plenty of space. If there is not enough space an extension ring for the panel may be required. This can be constructed out of sheet metal. A cover is required: the wire nut splices cannot be left dangling in space. Some hard line inspectors will require a listed junction box and not allow you to build or modify your own. However, it is common practice in industrial locations to modify boxes using sheet metal, etc. The new panel should have a work space of at least three feet in front and 6 ft. 6 inches high. For extending the circuits you can use the same cable sizes or place the wires in conduits. Remember is over 3 current carrying conductors are used in a raceway they are require to be derated. Use 90 degree insulation (THWN-2 for out doors and THHN for indoors) rated conductors and install no more than 9 in a raceway and this should not be a problem. Also do not fill raceways to more than 40 percent. Do not extend circuits using open single conductors - this is not allowed. They must be in a cable or raceway. These are some of the rules that may guide you.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Robert11 wrote:

Five options come to mind, in no particular order: 1) Don't upgrade 2) Rewire from the new service to the first junction on each branch 3) Pull the cables from the existing service to the attic or basement, and splice new runs from the new service to them in as many j-boxes as are needed. 4) Splice them in the existing service which you convert to a j-box 5) Install new service and feed old service from it as a sub-panel.
I'm guessing that 5) may be your best bet. If necessary, one or two existing circuits could be routed to the new service.
Ed
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.