Outdoor extension cord

Hello,
I have a critical requirement to prevent a birdbath from freezing via a birdbath heater. I had an outdoor GFI outlet installed but am going
to need an extension cord. It needs to be able to survive rain and snow throughout the winter. I bought an outdoor extension cord at Target but have no confidence in it -- it doesn't say it's weatherproof and in fact says not to use in the rain.
How about this one? Would it be safe to leave outside all winter?
http://www.home-improvement-superstore.com/ho-wah-gentin-kintron-sdnbhd-02367-06-25-16-3-blu-ext-cord.html
Thanks!
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In article

The cable itself is going to be waterproof, what probably won't be are the connections at each end. In the UK it is possible to buy waterproof mains connectors and I'm sure you will be able to do so as well.
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charles wrote:

Hey, if it's a critical requirement, the best way is stainless-steel jacketed mineral insulated cable in a concrete duct bank. Don't forget the automatic transfer switches at each end...maybe an N+1 redundant array of diesel generators in case both primary grid feeds fail. I think for well under $10,000,000 we can ensure your bird bath will never freeze.
Or you could drain the darn thing in the winter...
Bill
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Bill Shymanski wrote:

Or add anti-freeze.. Why shouldn't every creature enjoy French wine?
Plus, it will be sooo much quieter in the mornings, in the Spring..
Or short-out the thermostat.. it could save having to buy a Christmas turkey... and having to cook it..
But seriously, it is only 110v and protected by an earth leakage trip. What could go wrong?
--
Sue








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I'm surprised it's even 110V for that application. I would have thought 12V would have been more suitable and then you could use fairly standard connectors as used on cars.
If I were doing something like that it would probably Be 12V and the transformer in the shed or garage. Mind you, I do have a fairly small garden and copper losses not a big issue
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Stuart Winsor

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mind you, a pond heater at 12v could take quite a lot of amps.
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But it's a bird bath!
I know the americans have a reputation for "everything bigger" but....
I would visualise a bird bath being around 600mm at most and quite shallow.
I suppose you could go up to 24V (standard lorry electrics) or even 50V. The connectors would probably stand it.
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Stuart Winsor

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SW snipped-for-privacy@dsl.pipex.com says...

Yes, perhaps 1M diameter, uninsulated and open on the top. It gets quite cold in much of the country. Keeping one from freezing may take quite a bit of power.

How many watts do you think it'll take to keep a birdbath ice free all Winter? They aren't exactly well insulated. What gauge wire do you propose, to get the low-voltage power to the birdbath to keep the looses to a minimum?
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Keith

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Well, I think that question has been answered elsewhere with the reference to a commercial item so I'll go with that.

That will clearly depend on how long the run is. However, around 2.5-3mm sq should be ok to about 30ft
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shallow.
One might speculate that the OP is using somthing like this http://www.nelsonmfg.com/bird-bath-heater.htm
It puts me in mind of the "travel" coffie/tea heaters that were once sold.
Then again the variety listed here http://www.petvetsupply.com/bird-equipment-birdbath-heaters-and-accessories.html mostly seem to fall in the 200 - 250W range.
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Yes, that's pretty much what I'm using.
I've already had the 110v GFI outlet installed. I just want to determine the safest way to use an extension cord outdoors for the duration of the winter. Using the cord I linked to in my original post, it looks like I'd just need to cover the connections somehow. Someone suggested just using sandwich bags -- would that be appropriate? Charles mentioned a waterproof connector but I'm not having any success finding pictures online.
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In article

what is often known as a CEE connector are pretty good for this purpose, but possibly they're only a European thing. Often used on building sites, etc. Looking at the link below will tell you what I'm thinking about. Thee must be a US equivalent.
http://cpc.farnell.com/jsp/search/browse.jsp ;jsessionid=EQNMFR3525E31QFIAFOJKBQ?NA1+1001644+500001+116833+116937+6076+10070&_requestid"5552
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wrote:

50V.
thishttp://www.nelsonmfg.com/bird-bath-heater.htm
Wrap the two mated ends with a couple layers of vynal tape. I use Scotch 88 mostly. If you want to make it even more perminant one or 2 layers of rubber tape followed by a couple layer of vynal.
Try not to hit the cable with the snowblower or lawnmower.
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snipped-for-privacy@nospammeadelphia.net says...

Wrap the resultant mess in a baggie and wrap that in more vinyl tape.

What a shocking idea!
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wrote:

I do that with my outdoor Christmas lights every year. Mind you, I don't leave them up past January, but we get plenty of snow/ sleet/ rain in December. They're on a GFCI outdoor circuit and I've never had the GFCI trip (except when I test it), so it seems pretty reasonable to me.
daestrom
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daestrom@NO_SPAM_HEREtwcny.rr.com says...

I do too, even though they are on the porch or under the soffits. I forgot to mention that I tie a loose knot in the cords and have the wires exit the baggie one direction, facing down. It's likely overkill, but better than under.
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Keith

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88
For a professional install finish with a coat of http://www.paigewire.com/pdf/3Mscotchkote.pdf

Save the baggies for your lunch.
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On Sun, 2 Dec 2007 12:09:33 -0500, "Tim Perry"

Finally some sound advice. Just keep the cord ends up off the grounsd and arrange them to drain (receptacle end up). Much safer is to extend the GFCI circuit underground with UF cable and put an outlet by the birdbath but you know that ;-) Just be sure you can protect that cord from damage.
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On Dec 2, 12:30 pm, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Thanks for the help everyone. One more question: what about the GFI outlet itself? It has the standard cover over top of the receptical, but a little wind could easily blow some rain in there. Are any additional protections advisable?
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wrote:

We always use while in use covers. Here is a link. http://www.taymac.com/taymac/mm2.html
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