PE or Masters?

I've been out of college for 3yrs now. I work in an industrial environment
as an electrical engineer. I mainly deal with, lighting, power distribution,
motor controls, lightning protection etc. At this point in my career what
would be more advantageous; Masters or PE certification?
Thanks,
~R
Reply to
R. Banks
Loading thread data ...
distribution,
Those are not mutually exclusive choices. In that field, a PE will serve you well, and at some point may be required, so I recommend that you get it. However, don't discard the plans for a Masters either.
Ben Miller
Reply to
Ben Miller
I'm not in your industry, but suspect that a PE would be more practical at this time with regard to your career path. Like the other poster, I suggest you not ignore the urge for additional education.
Ken
Reply to
KWS
Both, its not that hard. you can get the PE in a few months
distribution,
Reply to
frankly
Thanks for all the responses...
What is a good study guide for the FE exam?
Reply to
R. Banks
FE Review Manual by Michael Lindeburg. I used it almost exclusively for my FE studying. I studied mainly on weekends for about 4 months and passed my first try after being out of school for 14 years.
Reply to
JC
Why not so both? A PE is basically just a test you take (and have to pass), a license fee and some documentation from someone attesting to your character and skills as an engineer. It amounts to very little effort on your part, and is a nice thing to put on a resume to help get you past the HR guys who do not know any better.
distribution,
Reply to
Bob Peterson
Based on my experience, most of the Electrical Engineers in the field I've met didn't have MSEE. The MSEE's lean toward theory (teaching, research) and not field applications? For example, I've studied the communications, EMF, power, microprocessors, robotics etc. but not once have we talked about the NEC. Now I used the NEC all the time.
My current job has projects from every aspect. (PLC, 480V motors, 2300V motors, distribution, surveillance, LPS, lighting, project management/tracking etc.) I don't know how I can channel all of my projects and future project experiences into an MSEE? That's why the PE came to mind.
Any thoughts?
Reply to
R. Banks
My point was more along the lines of it is not an "either or" situation. If you have the time and money available to do the MSEE, and more importantly want to do it, go ahead. Its unlikely to harm your job chances any and it may open up some areas for you that would otherwise be closed off.
Reply to
Bob Peterson
I'm an electrical engineer in the design end of the construction industry. It seems to me that the PE would be your first choice however, there are experience requirements that need to be met. First, you must pass the EIT exam (I may have some of this wrong, I passed my PE in 1987). The only requirement to sit for the EIT is an engineering degree from an accredited college. It's an 8 hour exam that test basic engineering fundamentals and basic chemistry, calc, etc. After that exam has been passed, you need to work under the direction of a PE for 4 years (they may allow experience prior to the EIT to count toward the 4 years). The pass rate for the PE when I took it was less than 20%. I don't know if that has improved or not but I think it has.
You can't go wrong with the PE in the facilty/construction field. In fact, most firm/facilities will require it for top level positions. The masters degree is also a good choice. Perhaps you could work on your masters and select courses that will help prepare you for the PE.
Check out
formatting link
for more info on getting your PE. Good luck. You will never regret getting your PE.
Dave
R. Banks wrote:
Reply to
dave
Greetings.
Erratum: Even though the same FE/EIT exams are the same everywhere, the requirements to sit for them vary with the proclivities of each state board. If you'll pardon my saying so (again?), it is inaccurate to say that an "accredited" degree is a universal requirement, particularly without defining "accredited" (which can have a variety of meanings in relation to degrees).
Addendum: Although I've yet to actually try their publications (yet another item on my list of things to do...), the web site for "Professional Publications, Inc."
formatting link
is a peerless source of general advice. While anything important should be verified with your local state board -- and, as necessary, the state board where you will be taking your test (hint) -- the PPI web site is a swell first stop.
Of course, none of the preceding is of any use to the original or most recent poster; it was added only for the benefit of future Googlers.
Cordially, Richard Kanarek, CET
Reply to
Richard Kanarek

PolyTech Forum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.