Power relay with control winding. -- Help

I'm looking for a relay (SPDT or DPDT) that runs off of line voltage, and has a second winding for control
When power is applied to the relay nothing happens until the lines
going to the control winding are shorted together. At this point the relay pulls in and power is passed to the load of up to 5 amps.
I used these years ago, and have forgotten the name of the manufacturer and the technical term for the relay. The term "Control Relay" doesn't quite do justice for what this relay can do.
Any and all help would be greatly appreciated.
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I think you're asking about a "shunt-trip relay."

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It has been a long time since I used relays. Is it possible that this control winding is really a shaded pole. The purpose would be to keep some magnetic field going even when current in the main winding went to zero. In essence, the two windings ma a two phase magnet. Bill
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Jim wrote:

Drat. I thought this thing was called a 'hysteresis relay' but apparently not according to Google. The frustrating part is that the house I used to live in has one of these relays in the central vacuum system, but I have to get clearance from two lawyers to visit that house now. There's got to be something in the Potter and Brumfield catalog, or maybe Omron.
Bill
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What you're describing sounds like an induction relay. It's been about 10 years since I used them, but B|W Controls still makes the 1500 series. Look at http://www.ametekapt.com/products/relays.cfm .
Mike
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Jim wrote:

I know what you are refering to, but I don't recall what they are called. As an option you can use a 24VAC relay, run the line voltage through the contacts, and power the coil from a 24V transformer through the low voltage control lines. The total cost of the readily available materials should be less than $10. The only downside is that it will require more space.
Ben Miller
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