help with fanuc oi control

Hi, Our new Kia has a fanuc oi control and uses either a rs232 serial interface to a computer, ethernet ( much too expensive)
or a pmacia card.
I would like to find a low cost solution to network this machine because using the serial interface with a computer is akward . The fanuc does not have a terminal emulator on the control.
I noticed that pcmcia memory cards are used with laptops, and belkin makes a pcmcia bluetooth card. I'm not sure if this is strictly an interface to access the host computer, or you can actually send data files to the card itself for storage. If the latter is the case, I can use a pc to send data files to pcmcia card that will sit fanuc pcmcia slot forever and never need to be removed.
Anyone using this sort of set up ?
Jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The PCMCIA slot on the Fanuc is strictly for memory. AFAIK there is no way to use it for networking.
You might consider this instead - http://tinyurl.com/wirefreecnc
But if the ethernet option is too expensive for you I doubt you'll find anything to make you happy.
--

Dan

CNC Videos - <http://tinyurl.com/yzdt6d
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I screwed up the url - http://tinyurl.com/5du3rs
--

Dan

CNC Videos - <http://tinyurl.com/yzdt6d
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote: <skip>

<skip> ==========It might be worthwhile to examine this assumption.
Why do you think it is too expensive, and what other uses would you have for an ethernet lan in your shop, assuming you don't already have one.
The avoidance of machine downtime because of a single cnc program/controller data loss or loss of other shop data such as tool/material/wip inventory, will quickly pay for a simple LAN. If in good condition, even an older computer with a large hard drive will be adequate for a starter server, and huge hard drives have gotten very cheap. for example http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo255389&Sku=TSD-250AS7 http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo "73390&CatId=8
If you set up an account with a local ISP, you can even do daily automated server critical file backups to a remote location.
What's the groups experence been with simple shop lans, how much does one actually cost, and what do you use it for?
Unka' George [George McDuffee] ------------------------------------------- He that will not apply new remedies, must expect new evils: for Time is the greatest innovator: and if Time, of course, alter things to the worse, and wisdom and counsel shall not alter them to the better, what shall be the end?
Francis Bacon (1561-1626), English philosopher, essayist, statesman. Essays, "Of Innovations" (1597-1625).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

LAN's are a PITA. Everytime you move a machine, get a new one, etc, you have to run wires.
The WAN I linked to starts at about $500.00 per machine. You can add other optional functionality to it such as remote machine monitoring.
--

Dan

CNC Videos - <http://tinyurl.com/yzdt6d
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

========Seems high
get a router - 40$ http://accessories.us.dell.com/sna/productdetail.aspx?sku 723741&cs&c=us&l=en&dgc=SS&cid0322&lidh0413
get cables - 20$ for 150 feet http://www.deepsurplus.com/HOME/Network-Patch-Cables?gclid=CNroqcTx4JQCFQYdswod9RR7Rg http://www.deepsurplus.com/Network-Structured-Wiring/Ethernet-CAT5e-Patch-Cables-150ft/150ft-Blue-Cat-5E-Patch-Cable-Molded
download server ubuntu - free http://packages.ubuntu.com/hardy /
install on an existing PC with a big hard drive. Most likely have one on hand if not 70$ for 400 Gig HD upgrade
and get started.
upgrade as required/desired based on actual experience.
Don't let the better be the enemy of the good, and the best be the enemy of them both.
Unka' George [George McDuffee] ------------------------------------------- He that will not apply new remedies, must expect new evils: for Time is the greatest innovator: and if Time, of course, alter things to the worse, and wisdom and counsel shall not alter them to the better, what shall be the end?
Francis Bacon (1561-1626), English philosopher, essayist, statesman. Essays, "Of Innovations" (1597-1625).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The Fanuc Oi is a low end cheap control. The O series was first introduced in 1986-87 well before ethernet. The Oi is usually found on Korean and Chaiwanese machines that are also low cost. As such the builders usually don't opt to include the ethernet adapter on the control. I don't have pricing handy but it's probably a $2,000.00 upcharge from Fanuc plus $1,100.00 to install.
If you have older controls, ethernet isn't even an option. Wireless is a pretty simple way to go. It can use the RS232 port on your old controls and the ethernet adapter found in newer controls.
--

Dan

CNC Videos - <http://tinyurl.com/yzdt6d
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Recently I had an O-tc pop the serial port. I know there is another one on board because I looked at it and saw two serial line driver and reciever chips connected to an open connector.
Called up Fanuc, asked how much for board and how much for the option. They told me the 1500 buck replacement board was cheaper. Something is way wrong with that. I have a feeling ethernet has to be even more pricey.
Wes
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@lycos.com wrote in wrote:

If you are swapping the board out yourself it's way cheaper than the option mainly because they have to send a tech out to turn on the option. Depending on your location they will either make money or lose money on the option.
If it's a newer control, Fanuc has a PITA deal now where the control is password protected. Fanuc USA has to e-mail Japan for the password which will work only once. The whole deal has added a huge chunk of time to getting options installed.
--

Dan

CNC Videos - <http://tinyurl.com/yzdt6d
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Working for a small plant in a really big corporation, 500 bucks sounds right. That wire got ran by a contractor after layers of management okayed, issued, supervised, verified and finally paid for the install. Gitterdone isn't in the corporate lexicon where I work and we are very profitable.
Wes
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
<snip>
On Sun, 27 Jul 2008 20:19:41 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@lycos.com wrote:

-------------- You are very fortunate. More and more the omission of "gitterdone" appears to be the root of the inability of increasing of US numbers companies to compete.
Your comment about approval by layers of management being required for a 500$ expenditure appears to correct. Spending more money on analysis and evaluation than what the entire project costs to implement appears to be the new norm, but then no one makes a mistake that way..... GM, Ford and Chrysler appear to be leaders here.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thanks for all the replies.
To clarify a few things:
1. I already use both hardwire networking and wan for our machines.
2. For the Kia, I am currently using a wan to a pc and the serial input on the Kia control to xfer programs. My opinion -- akward.
3. The Kia is ethernet ready. To turn on the option is around 4K -- plain stupid.
My question revolves around the workings of the pcmcia memory card itself. It seems to me that someone makes ( or should consider making ) a pcmcia card that can be wireless written to via wan or bluetooth. In other words, when you put power to the card, it has wireless read/write capability residing on the card itself.
This would mean I could change the memory contents from a remote computer without having to remove it from the pcmcia slot. It would show up on my office pc as another drive.
I have mostly cincinati controls in our shop and the networking option was only $500 bucks. Still a unreasonable , but not criminal.
Jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Agreed. Why not just load the program onto a memory card and skip the WAN to PC?

There are wireless PC cards. But the control doesn't support them. The "Wire Free CNC" deal I linked to is basically what you are looking for.

Customers demand low price machines so the builders demand low cost controls. Why should Fanuc be run as a non profit organization? Kia could have provided the option for a much lower cost by ordering the control with it from Fanuc than Fanuc can offer it as a field install.
Fanuc's flat rate pricing is part of the problem. If you are located near one of their service centers the prices are way higher than their costs. If you are located in a remote area the price you pay is being subsidized by the guy who's close.
--

Dan

CNC Videos - <http://tinyurl.com/yzdt6d
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No OS or drivers in the control to support the network card. The PCMCIA slot is merely configured as a memory device and there is no simple way to change that. In fact depending on the control and version the memory card might even have to be a certain type, in a particular format, and may not exceed a specified size.
The wireless PCMCIA adapters only relay data. They aren't configured like a memory card so the control can't communicate with the adapter.
--

Dan

CNC Videos - <http://tinyurl.com/yzdt6d
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Depending on the speed of the RS232, the settings on the control and PC, and the software on the PC for sending/receiving, RS232 can actually be pretty damn good. It sounds like you already have a PC right next to the control, so you're already half way there. I was in a shop one time that had a system where the operator entered the part number, and the program was located and downloaded from the server all via RS232. It was very cool.
In my opinion, the memory card or USB stick are the absolute worst way to transfer normal sized programs. It just adds a whole bunch of steps.
On a Mazak Fusion control, it's as quick as 2-3 softkeys, and hitting "send" in Cimco on the program that you just posted. I can have a program from the Mastercam Operations Manager, into the machine control in well under 10 seconds.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

http://www.shopfloorautomations.com/index.php
http://www.multi-dnc.com/products_WiBox.php
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.