Superposition Theorem

Superposition theorem is one of those strokes of genius that takes a complex subject and simplifies it in a way that makes perfect sense.
It is very useful for solving tricky electrical circuits, Just go through the following article to get complete description and illustrative examples on Superposition Theorem.
http://www.ezdia.com/Superposition_Theorem/Content.do?id 52
The strategy used in the Superposition Theorem is to eliminate all but one source of power within a network at a time, using series/parallel analysis to determine voltage drops (and/or currents) within the modified network for each power source separately.
Hope the above article helps you in your exams .. :-)
With best regards,
Weasley
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Superposition theorem is one of those strokes of genius that takes a complex subject and simplifies it in a way that makes perfect sense.
It is very useful for solving tricky electrical circuits, Just go through the following article to get complete description and illustrative examples on Superposition Theorem.
http://www.ezdia.com/Superposition_Theorem/Content.do?id 52
The strategy used in the Superposition Theorem is to eliminate all but one source of power within a network at a time, using series/parallel analysis to determine voltage drops (and/or currents) within the modified network for each power source separately.
Hope the above article helps you in your exams .. :-)
With best regards,
Weasley
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Weasley wrote:

Hello, and while it's convenient to have the fundamentals on-line, as long we're covering undergraduate circuits topics you might well have mentioned Norton's theorem and Kirchoff's voltage and current laws. Sincerely,
--
John Wood (Code 5550) e-mail: snipped-for-privacy@itd.nrl.navy.mil

Naval Research Laboratory
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In article

While I do not dispute the link's utility as an elementary introduction, superposition was well understood for LINEAR physical system for at least as longer, I believe, as Ohm's law was formulated. It arises from the mathematics of simultaneous linear algebraic equations. It shows up most clearly in the matrix formulation of circuit theory using current loops. It is intrinsic to the properties of determinants as used in Cramer's rule.
It would be most useful to cite who first formulated that explicitly. My cursory search of Wikipedia did not establish who first came up with superposition, but it extends at least as far as Fourier who used it fgor solving temperature distributions, no electric circuits.
Bill
--
An old man would be better off never having been born.

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Superposition is a mathematical concept, known long before any form of circuit analysis, that we can use for linear circuits. All the circuit analysis,(e.g. series/ parallel, Thevenin/Norton, Loop and Nodal analysis would be useless), except for Kirchoff's Laws, in a non-linear case where superposition doesn't apply. The superposition theorem is simply an application of this essential property of linear systems.
See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Superposition_principle
----- Don Kelly cross out to reply
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