Two competing 240V supplies into one sink

It's been some time since I did power distribution theory, so could a guru answer this please?
The www.windsave.com wind generator plugs straight into a socket in
your house. It apparently phase-locks with your house supply and then supplies your mains appliances with a proportion of the energy they consume. I am interested in knowing what governs the proportion of power an appliance consumes from each source. In other words how can the wind generator electrically muscle in over the (presumably colossal) capacity of the grid?
Thanks in advance Jimbo
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It's been some time since I did power distribution theory, so could a guru answer this please?
The www.windsave.com wind generator plugs straight into a socket in your house. It apparently phase-locks with your house supply and then supplies your mains appliances with a proportion of the energy they consume. I am interested in knowing what governs the proportion of power an appliance consumes from each source. In other words how can the wind generator electrically muscle in over the (presumably colossal) capacity of the grid?
Thanks in advance Jimbo
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| It's been some time since I did power distribution theory, so could a | guru answer this please? | | The www.windsave.com wind generator plugs straight into a socket in | your house. It apparently phase-locks with your house supply and then | supplies your mains appliances with a proportion of the energy they | consume. I am interested in knowing what governs the proportion of | power an appliance consumes from each source. In other words how can | the wind generator electrically muscle in over the (presumably | colossal) capacity of the grid?
Raise the voltage until the level of current reaches the level intended to be supplied, but not over the maximum current and not over the maximum voltage. The wind generator would just look like a power factor of -1 to the utility (meaning, current flows the other way).
Note that paralleling with the utility can be dangerous if not connected with the right equipment. Also, connecting it at the wrong place in the house can be dangerous, too. I hope these are accounted for.
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| Phil Howard KA9WGN (ka9wgn.ham.org) / Do not send to the address below |
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wrote:

--------------- It may not actually raise the voltage as that would increase its var load. It will advance phase slightly to take on power (as is the case with generators on the grid).
You have pointed out serious considerations a)output must be limited to what the circuit can handle. b)what fuse/breaker protection is provided. c)other safety and legal considerations arise.
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Don Kelly snipped-for-privacy@shawcross.ca
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Depends on the details.
For example, if the wind "generator" is an induction motor that runs faster than "sync" speed it will functions as an induction generator. When the generator slows down below sync speed it would be disconnected from the "grid."
Perhaps some "two stage" connection would be made when the generator speeds up with stage one including some resistance between the generator and the "grid."
With a DC generator and a properly designed inverter the system would pump out all the power it can. If that's more than your house uses the excess would go toward the outside "grid" and it would, indeed, turn the meter backwards.
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John Gilmer wrote:

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