Vector group nomenclature

Hie, I appreciate what the first two digits; 4 and 1 stand for in the following
vector group nomeclature;
41Dy11:
The 4 stands for group. What group is being referred to here?
The 1 stands for 1st in group. Can you shed more light here please?
Thanks
Kufa
Reply to
kumbi
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Maybe this site will give you a start:
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Reply to
Tom Biasi
This whole thing seems to be over complicated. First, I believe the nomenclature "vector" is passe but might be kept around to confuse people. The term should be phasor." It is probably motivated by the same who insist on still talking 110 volt instead of the almost universal 120 volt.
Reply to
Salmon Egg
"Vector" was the term used before "phasor" Yes, it does date back to the 110V, then 115V, periods and apparently the term wasn't changed in the literature (remember cycles/sec vs Hertz, or as I saw on the nameplate of a 1915+/- vintage 60Hz induction motor "120 Alts".
To you, the nomenclature is over complicated but it is there as a turn the crank 'rule'. Another example is the old "Westinghouse Transmission Book" full of useful information but for transmission lines it gave a look up table approach that doesn't require any real understanding of the basis of the table. Useful- yes- but limited. There are many ways to connect polyphase transformers and this is simply one of the nameplate notations used to identify factory configurations. It is particularly important to identify primary secondary phase shifts if there are loops. I understand that present practice is to simply include a diagram. In any case it is wise to test.
Reply to
Don Kelly
It is certainly easier for me to bitch about a bad situation than to come up with a good solution. It is indeed difficult to squeeze all pertinent information onto a tiny nameplate. Providing a phasor diagram with ends notated by the actual connection labels might be a start. Is there a standard for such nameplates? If not, it may be time for an organization such as ASA or IEEE to set one.
Even so, it may be difficult to handle all the possibilities. I had one application that used a three-phase core for a two-phase application. How would you designate transformers that need to work with others? For example, sometimes you need to exceed six phases in rectifying situations when you are trying to minimize high frequency harmonics.
There truly is a need for understanding rather than rote.
Reply to
Salmon Egg
Hello All
I have been quietly following this discussion, and have been slightly surprised that no one has pointed out that all of this is covered in Standards.
Power Transformers are covered in the international IEC specification 60076-1, and unfortunately there is also an American standards C57.12.00, and C57.12.90, and they do not totally agree.
If you want to get some idea of the differences put "IEC transformer" into your search engine, and fairly high up the hits you will find a PDF comparing the International & American standards.
John
Reply to
John Rye
Sorry Eng K. Kufa for the late reply but i hope this will help someone, i think its best explained in the BS 171 standard (1970).
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Reply to
Kudzai Edwick Mukuze
Sorry Eng K. Kufa for the late reply but i hope this will help someone, i think its best explained in the BS 171 standard (1970).
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Reply to
Kudzai Edwick Mukuze

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