What size electrical junction box fits a 1-inch diameter cable anyway?

Today I tried to connect a 1-inch wide flexible conduit to what was billed as a 1-inch outdoor junction box:
However, the 1-inch side of the old elbow clearly was too small to fit the threads in the 1-inch hole of the new reputedly 1-inch junction box:

Yet, the 1-inch side of the old elbow was just as clearly too large to fit the threads in the 3/4 inch hole of a 3/4 inch junction box:

Clearly I'm confused. Or I bought the wrong type of junction box. Does a solution seem clear to you?
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UPDATE:
It's mostly done. Thanks for all the advice. I learned a lot.

A lesson learned is those patent-pending one-piece connectors stink!

You have to spin the entire cable to remove them!
That's the problem I was trying to avoid in the first place!
Tomorrow I'll pick up two more two-piece connectors and finish the job.
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wrote:

Golly Gee Danny. The octopus has grown :)
You can get to the strainer baskets easier and remove the tops, IF you don't trip over that thing. You still have to bonding wire to connect.
Don't trip, okay?
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On Thu, 16 May 2013 08:54:05 -0700, Oren wrote:

I did specifically plan the location of the cleaner pump (the one at 45) so that not only did the pipes not run over the top of the basket, but that I could get my (rather large) body all around it to service the heater and the other pumps.
So, while the octopus has grown, it now has the advantage of: a) Must easier access to the baskets and pump b) Easy disconnection of the pump and wiring c) Re-use of one pump for another with only minor effort
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On Thu, 16 May 2013 19:49:43 +0000 (UTC), "Danny D."

I could tell you were a big guy. Figured you wear ~ a size 11 shoe.
(you left wet foot prints on the pavers when you drained the filter)

...go for it
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On Fri, 17 May 2013 09:18:28 -0700, Oren wrote:

You scare me. A lot! I'm going to have to switch nyms again, just to start fresh! :)
BTW, I think every thing you said, turned out to be the best practice, in the end. As was said by Bob, trader4, and others.
I just didn't understand it all.
Right now, I have to pack for camping, but, the good news is that it's all buttoned up, and, well, the *original* leaks are wholly fixed!

The key problem is that there are new leaks, at the interface between the pool pump and the motor.

I think there is a "seal" there that I've never replaced. Maybe I damaged it. Dunno - but *both* motors are leaking from that location!

Unfortunately, I have the "band" tightened as far as it will go by hand:

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wrote:

Won't work. You are a creature of habit; like all of us.

Bad seal at the motor shaft, behind the impeller. 2nd notice. I brought this up already.

The motor side of the volute. The shaft seal is leaking? Causing the bearing to rust, related to chlorine. It gets worse if you let it.

I'm clueless.

When you tighten this stainless band on the volute, use caution.
- the O-ring is aligned, lubed, seated
- hold the motor from underneath / support by hand so to assist a non-stressed, finessed attachment.
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n
e
d
brought this up already. >>>>
Bingo! +2
DDD- You're headed to pump repair or replacement now. :(
When you put in the new pumps you can re-wire the whole installation correctly and get rid of that dumb box / stepping stone Rube Goldberg arrangement.
Oh well.....
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wrote:

A few parts, but it depends. IME, a shaft seal, impeller and O-ring. Inspect the shaft bearing behind seal for rust. No rust, it should be fine for now. The seal leaks and corrodes the bearing from chlorine (motors squeal). Not real expensive.

A damn insult to Rednecks, I swear

...we'll have another 500 on topic threads
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On all of the pumps I have worked on the ceramic seal actually seals to the impeller and the pump housing. The shaft is not sealed. They can be pretty nasty and still work OK. I have 3 pool pumps and a well pump that all have 5/8" shafts and use the same bearing (a sealed 6203). I went to an online bearing place and got 10 bearings for what one costs locally. I throw new bearings at any pump I rebuild now.
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On Sat, 18 May 2013 17:32:58 -0400, gfretwell wrote:

I have three pool pumps, one fountain pump, and two well pumps; so it behooves me to learn how to replace their bearings.
Looking at my old AO Smith QC1102 1.0x1.65SF HP motors (I have four to choose from) I see the bearings appear to be the same as yours.

I'll google what these markings indicate: a. 6203V USA NSK b. 6203D 2145 CHINA KBC
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wrote:

6203 is the important part. That is the size of the bearing You also want "sealed" bearings, not "shielded" bearings in a pump and don't lose the "slinger" that washer between the pump and motor that seems to have no purpose. It takes water migrating down the shaft and "slings" it away before it gets to the bearing. Other than that, the only trick is getting the bearing off the shaft. A bearing puller is a great thing to have. A piece of 1/2" schedule 40 pipe seems to be a good driver to put it back. You want to be sure the driver only pushes on the inner race.
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On Mon, 20 May 2013 02:06:54 -0400, gfretwell wrote:

Thanks for that information as the bearing designation definitely still confuses me (if I wish to understand the various suffixes).
Googling, I see the shield is a non contact surface, while the seal is a contact surface (for what it's worth).
The old bearings were the 6203V NSK USA while the rebuilder (for about $150) put in the KBC 2145 6203D China bearings:

Googling, I find the AO Smith part number, size, & description is: 604005-001 ID=0.6693",OD=1.5750",W=0.470" double sealed high thrust
The nominal size for a 6203 bearing seems to be slightly different: 6203 ID=0.66993", OD=1.5748", W=0.4724"
But, maybe that's just a function of metric-to-english conversion: IDmm, OD@mm, Wmm
The actual 6203 apparently boils down to this: 6 = metric, single row ball bearing, deep groove 2 = light duty (e.g., 40mm OD, 12mm width) 03 = 17 mm bore diameter
The 6203 is so common, I find a confusing array of suffixes: 6203D (http://webshop.abfbearings.com/Bearing/6203D-KBC/329328 ) 6203V (http://www.tanchin-hk.com/bearings-shop-22026-NSK.html ) 6203LL (http://www.spapartsshop.com/na-6203-ll.aspx ) 6203ZZ (http://www.vxb.com/page/bearings/PROD/kit1040) 6203RS (http://www.inyopools.com/Products/07501352012909.htm ) 62032RS(http://www.thebigbearingstore.com/servlet/the-424/6203-dsh-2RS-6203-dsh-ZZ-Radial-Ball/Detail ) etc.
From the advertising, these "seem" to be what the suffix indicates: 6203D (deep groove, ball, single row, rubber seal on one side) 6203V (deep groove, ball) 6203LL (same as 2RS) 6203ZZ (double, staked, non-contact, 300 series stainless steel shields) 6203RS (rubber seals) 62032RS (two rubber seals)
This is all so confusing... that I think I'll call AO Smith for advice.
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wrote:

62032RS(http://www.thebigbearingstore.com/servlet/the-424/6203-dsh-2RS-6203-dsh-ZZ-Radial-Ball/Detail )

I think mine are 2RS/LL
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On Wed, 22 May 2013 02:10:46 +0000, Danny D wrote:

Googling, I find the bearing suffixes are confusingly arcane.
There are "old" and "new" suffixes referenced here: http://www.bearing-online.net/search/index.asp?page 3&mtype=&new_model=&old_model=&in_num=&out_num=&h_num=&leixing And single versus double shield codes explained here: http://www.dynaroll.com/shields.asp
Prefixes and suffixes are explained here: http://www.ahrinternational.com/FAG_nomenclature.shtml And this description was found on a.h.r:
D = molded Buna-N rubber lip seal with a steel insert which provides maximum protection against contamination; however, the high pressure of the lip seal itself results in greatly increased torque and friction losses that can cause heat build-up in higher speed applications. The seal material itself is rated to a maximum of 250 °F S = same as D except it's non contact DD = same as D but double shielded M = brass cage V = single, contact, nitrile rubber seal (keeps fluids out) Z = single, staked, non-contact shield of 300 series stainless steel. LL = ? seems to be the same as 2RS ? NR = snap ring and groove RS = single nitrile rubber seal TS = glass reinforced teflon giving good contamination protection VV = double non-contact seal ZS = same as ZZ but retained by a snap wire TTS = same as TS, but double shielded ZZS = same as ZS but double shielded ZZ = double, staked, non-contact, 300 series stainless steel shields ZZA = removable shield 2RS = double nitrile rubber seals DDU = double contact seals (apparently similar to 2RS)
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On Mon, 20 May 2013 12:44:39 -0400, gfretwell wrote:

You're not kidding that bearing suffixes are confusing as all hell!
I suspect for my $150, the Chinese bearings my motor rebuilder put in are likely the cheapest he could get away with. So it behooves us to rebuild our own motors, where we can put in the best bearings.
The trick is to figure out *what* is the best bearing to use!
To get a handle on what the bearing needs to be, I called the AO Smith technical support hotline at 800-262-6484. The lady from Tennessee knew absolutely nothing about bearings, but she kindly read off the specs for me off the motor datasheets.
The bearings are made by NSK and they list the part numbers as: QC1102 1.65HP motor: 6203 double sealed NSK 6203WC3E CLKEEMSM SQ1152 2.20HP motor: 6203 double sealed NSK 62032RSGC3ETDEEMS9
Googling for those NSK numbers, I don't find anything useful. But, when I google the part number (604005-001), I can find it as: $19, 62032RS http://www.inyopools.com/Products/07501352012909.htm
So, now that gives me 6203D, 6203V, and 6203RS as the bearings, all of which are different - which is driving me crazy.
What I'm doing now is reading the NSK booklet titled: "The ABCs of Bearings", located here: http://www.nsk.com/services/basicknowledge/manual/abc/
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On 22/05/13 12:12, Danny D wrote:

Are you guys talking about a pool pump motor ? If so the 2RS suffix is all you need and is correct for the job being 2 sealing shields for both sides of the bearing (my ex profession) all the others are for special needs. Don't try to be too technical :-)
Cheers !!
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.....Don't try to be too technical :-) .....
+1
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On Wed, 22 May 2013 07:50:06 -0700, DD_BobK wrote:

As stated prior, everything is easy once you already know the answer. Until then, you need to be technical to find out the answer.
Here's the answer (as far as I know):

If that's correct, then it's just a list; and there's no need to be technical. However, if that's not correct (and it might not be), then I need to get technical again ... until the list is fleshed out.
At the moment, I am trying to figure out the o-ring trade names.
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On Wed, 22 May 2013 10:05:44 -0700, Oren wrote:

REPORT:
Here's the current factual report for proper rebuilding of such pumps: (Note: I have not figured out how to xref to the o-ring trade size yet.) -----
----- AO Smith QC1102 1.65HP(net) motor: a. bearing, nitrile double sealed (not shielded), 6203-2RS (2) b. thru-bolt (4) 606202-071 1/4"hexhead, #8x32-1" 0.272" 9.375" (9 3/8") SS ----- Sta-Rite Max-e-glas II Pool Pump Repair Kit (GO-KIT38-9) c. 3/4" shaft seal 3/4" (Buna7400-0027S, PS201)(Viton7400-0028S, PS3868) d. seal plate o-ring (U9-228A; may be trade size O-113) e. pre1998: Insert o-ring U9-376 (may be trade size O-240) f. diffuser o-ring (U9-37A; may be trade size O-83) g. trap cover o-ring (U9-375; may be trade size O-12) h. drain plug o-ring (x2) U9-359 Note: The O-ring trade-size guesses are based on the Aladdin GO-KIT38-9.
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