Train question

Howdy, I just recently bought the #4512 cargo train kit, along with the #4514 cargo crane, and the #10016 tanker car.
I've got the track set up in the usual oval form with 6 straight-ways between the curves. While pulling all 7 cars that I've got on the track, it tends to lose it's girp after turning the speed regulator up past the 4th setting. I've got enough of my old train parts that I could build another engine to help with the load, but I was wondering if having two engines on a single track would overload the regulator? I'm planning on getting 2 more cars and a lot more track in about a week, so would adding another engine to my cart be a good idea?
Thanks! Daniel Roberts.
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I've run two locos off a single pack. I set up a large loop with 25-30 straights per side and had 2 trains chasing each other. The only thing I observed was that one loco ran slower then the other. Not sure if this was due to variances in the motors or from current drain on the rails. Sadly I'm not enough of an electrician to figure it out. But nothing smoked or burned out so I guess it was OK.
My $.03 anyway...
- Joe

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Of two locomotives you'll always have one that is slightly slower due to differences in the motors and other factors.
Many model railroad companies are producing locomotives with DCC (Digital Command Control). This allows for constant track power (good for powering accessories), then digital signals are sent through the rails and decoded in chips on the locomotive to tell it how fast to go.
One benefit is that you can instruct two locomotives to travel at the same speed.
Another benefit is that trains with two-rail track can now navigate reverse loops without causing a short circuit.
Theoretically someone could modify a Lego locomotive to use DCC (Atlas sells relatively inexpensive kits) that might work on a Lego train. Hopefully future Lego trains will have DCC - especially as their popularity increases and track plans start to require it.
With DCC, you can even run two trains in opposite directions on the same track.

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<<snip>>

"Theoretically..."?
Try a google search on "lego trains DCC"... it turned up over 1300 hits, including this one...
http://home.surewest.net/markril/lego/dcc /
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One comment. DCC or DC, even for AC, the "two rail reverse loop problem" is EXACTLY the same! Switching to DCC does *NOT* eliminate this problem!
There are automatic electronic devices that can do the required switching for you, and this is true in both DC and DCC.
It's true that the locos will continue to run in the same direction with DCC, but a short circuit will still occur when the train crosses the block gaps (you still need them) without special additional circuitry.
Dan Mitchell ========Neb Okla wrote:

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Neb Okla wrote:

So if you've got a model cornfield, some bleachers, and a couple steam engines marked for the MKT, you're all set . . .
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