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What does soap or its aftermeath boil at? And what /is/ its meath after it burns?

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Autymn D. C. wrote:

look it up
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malibu wrote:

where?
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google for it. I got 47 hits for aftermeath, and 70,700,000 for soap.
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John wrote:

The key words are soap and boil, and Google didn't help.
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In sci.physics, Autymn D. C.
wrote on 10 Dec 2006 23:37:24 -0800

I frankly don't know what "aftermeath" is. "meath" is a place name, specifically a county in Leinste, in the E Republic of Ireland.
I'm assuming you meant "hot process". Since soap is made from fats or oils (using lye), the soap melting point may be dependent on the fat or oil used; beef tallow melts at 130 degrees Fahrenheit. However, the process described at
http://waltonfeed.com/old/soap/soapcook.html
mentions that the optimum temperature will rise as the soap thickens, and can get as high as 330 degrees.
It also mentions that the process is very dangerous. It's probably simpler just to use a hand blender instead.
http://waltonfeed.com/old/soap/soap.html
Hot or cold, be very careful with the lye (sodium hydroxide). Among other things, lye crystals dissolving in water can boil it, in large enough amounts. Also, use wooden or plastic spoons and enameled, plastic, or glass bowls for mixing -- you don't want to make aluminum hydroxide.
I've not done this myself (though I do have some raw, rancid fat, were I all that interested in ruining my countertops with sodium hydroxide :-) ).
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The Ghost In The Machine wrote:

I think his "aftermeath" is an English (Brit) way of saying aftermath. So, my guess is that he wants to know what the residue, or soap really boils at. You answered his question as best it could be.
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In sci.physics, David Kercsmar
wrote on Sat, 16 Dec 2006 12:49:43 -0500

Given what little I know about the subject, and what I could find on the Web.
The quirks of the process are mildly interesting, and not really surprising in retrospect. I had not known, for example, that coconut oil makes big bubbles, or that beef tallow soap has better cleansing power (but fewer bubbles) than other variants.
Still...it looks tricky. :-)
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David Kercsmar wrote:

There is no he, and there is no a in meath. (Neither is there e or ee, as the dolthood today believe.) No, he did not--as the sites also underscore the boiling to the water (which should also be weatter) and not the soap. Look at the subject, Ghost: It's a sliht joke. But I still want to know.
E. meath[o] ~ L. rendur[e]
-Aut
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