Research Study Detects Thermoelectromagnetic Convection in Amalgam Fillings

A scientific study carried out by researchers in Iran and published by
the Journal of DentoMaxilloFacial Radiology has reported
thermoelectromagnetic convection effects in amalgam dental fillings
when subjected to MRI scanning.
The abstract from the report concludes:
"The results of this study suggest that MRI is not a completely safe
technique in patients with amalgam restorations. It was shown that the
main effect of fields led to the appearance of thermoelectromagnetic
convection, which is responsible for the enhancement of the diffusion
process, grain boundary migration and vacancy formation resulting in
microleakage."
See:
formatting link

As far as I know there is no electrolysis, or "galvanic activity",
involved in thermoelectromagnetic convection phenomena.
I'd say that this study proves beyond any doubt that, just like all
the rest of the metallic materials in the universe, metal amalgam
dental fillings really do have electromagnetic properties, even if the
established dental profession still maintains the habit of ignoring
these properties whenever it can.
It has been demonstrated that amalgam dental fillings generate
electrical potentials with magnitudes of up to 350 millivolts - see
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It has also been demonstrated that amalgam potentials of this
magnitude arise even when the fillings are NOT IN CONTACT WITH ANY
SALIVA - see
formatting link

However, even though it is possible to routinely measure amalgam
potentials using a cheap hand-operated volt-meter (see
formatting link
), it appears
that experiments have still not been caried out in order to determine
the degree to which these potentials are able to dissipate electrical
energy through the nerves in people's heads.
The use of amalgams in dentistry was established long before anyone
even knew what an electron was; and it was quickly followed by the
rise to prominence of psychiatric "medicine" in our societies.
It seems eminently possible that, since it has been making judgements
from a position of ignorance in these matters for all these years, the
established dental profession has failed to recognise that the real
cause of much of the so-called "psychiatric" and/or "neurological"
disfunction in our populations is the effect of the electrical
behavior of amalgam dental fillings on the neurological system (search
Google Groups for "150 years of electric batteries in people's
teeth").
Does anyone disagree?
Remember that, although it is the natural function of the human
neurologiocal system to transmit electrical signals via nerve tissue,
it is not the natural function of the human neurological system to be
permanently dissipating the electrical potentials generated by amalgam
fillings in teeth.
And don't forget, there is no electrolysis involved.
Keith P Walsh
PS "Enquiries Concerning The Electrical Properties of Dental Amalgams"
can be found at:
formatting link

Reply to
Keith P Walsh
Loading thread data ...
Unbelieveable! Iranians?
I would like to see this verified by any US or European credible research group first.
I don't discount it outright because the bimetallic fillings do produce electricity in small amounts in the presence of mouth acids. Some people are more acid than others. Not a good thing as the teeth involved are connected to the nerves next to one of the largest nerve complexes in the head.
And yep, I've measured the potential voltage with a very sensitive volt meter in situ. So those who blow it off as unimportant are just plain... ignorant. They have never seen the cases where patients are severly effected by even small voltages. Once removed the change in the patient can be dramatic [so has been reported to me] -- Graystar -- "The birth of an idea is the happy moment in which everything appears possible and reality has not yet entered into the problem." - Rudolph Diesel
Reply to
Graystar
...
I would even say that all materials in the universe, not only the metallic ones, have electromagnetic properties.
This includes the semi-conductors, the dielectrics, the ferrites, the diamagnetics.. All of those, I would say, have electromagnetic properties!
So it is a bit unclear to me what is new here..
Reply to
Jos Bergervoet
just pat keith on the head and tell hi "okay", and leave it at that.
You see keith just doesn't understand what he is talking about most of the time.
Somehow just didn't pay attention in basic electronics class and sure didn't pay any attention in physics or chemistry.
Reply to
Bob Officer
Right! So this scientific study carried out by researchers in Iran has now, for the first time, established that dental fillings are not consisting of dark matter.
One less dark matter candidate.. We're closing in!
Reply to
Jos Bergervoet
Oh, so its not just me that is incompetent bob, but every person other than yourself? Why aren't I surprised?
Reply to
carole
What is the deleterious effect from MRI that isn't safe?
I imagine the same effect would apply to anybody with any type of metal including metal plates, pins or screws.
Reply to
carole
Because while dissimilar metals might cause current flow in acid solution, they must be separate and distinct, like electrodes in a battery, not compounded like in an amalgm.Current flows between the dissimilar metals. If the metals are mixed up, the is not any current flow. Simple Physics and Chemistry, Carole stuff taught in most school in Intro or Basic classes between the 7th-9th year of school.
Reply to
Bob Officer
including metal plates, pins or
You didn't read the article did you Carole.
"patients with implanted metallic objects are excluded from MRI."
Carole scores a *** Zero ****for reading comprehension, again.
Anyone spend the 15 dollars for the full article? I wonder about Time/rate/flux field figures.
Reply to
Bob Officer
A scientific study carried out by researchers in Iran and published by the Journal of DentoMaxilloFacial Radiology has reported thermoelectromagnetic convection effects in amalgam dental fillings when subjected to MRI scanning.
The abstract from the report concludes:
"The results of this study suggest that MRI is not a completely safe technique in patients with amalgam restorations. It was shown that the main effect of fields led to the appearance of thermoelectromagnetic convection, which is responsible for the enhancement of the diffusion process, grain boundary migration and vacancy formation resulting in microleakage."
See:
formatting link

As far as I know there is no electrolysis, or "galvanic activity", involved in thermoelectromagnetic convection phenomena.
I'd say that this study proves beyond any doubt that, just like all the rest of the metallic materials in the universe, metal amalgam dental fillings really do have electromagnetic properties, even if the established dental profession still maintains the habit of ignoring these properties whenever it can.
It has been demonstrated that amalgam dental fillings generate electrical potentials with magnitudes of up to 350 millivolts - see
formatting link

It has also been demonstrated that amalgam potentials of this magnitude arise even when the fillings are NOT IN CONTACT WITH ANY SALIVA - see
formatting link

However, even though it is possible to routinely measure amalgam potentials using a cheap hand-operated volt-meter (see
formatting link
), it appears that experiments have still not been caried out in order to determine the degree to which these potentials are able to dissipate electrical energy through the nerves in people's heads.
The use of amalgams in dentistry was established long before anyone even knew what an electron was; and it was quickly followed by the rise to prominence of psychiatric "medicine" in our societies.
It seems eminently possible that, since it has been making judgements from a position of ignorance in these matters for all these years, the established dental profession has failed to recognise that the real cause of much of the so-called "psychiatric" and/or "neurological" disfunction in our populations is the effect of the electrical behavior of amalgam dental fillings on the neurological system (search Google Groups for "150 years of electric batteries in people's teeth").
Does anyone disagree?
Remember that, although it is the natural function of the human neurologiocal system to transmit electrical signals via nerve tissue, it is not the natural function of the human neurological system to be permanently dissipating the electrical potentials generated by amalgam fillings in teeth.
And don't forget, there is no electrolysis involved.
Keith P Walsh
PS "Enquiries Concerning The Electrical Properties of Dental Amalgams" can be found at:
formatting link

Reply to
Jan Drew
A scientific study carried out by researchers in Iran and published by the Journal of DentoMaxilloFacial Radiology has reported thermoelectromagnetic convection effects in amalgam dental fillings when subjected to MRI scanning.
The abstract from the report concludes:
"The results of this study suggest that MRI is not a completely safe technique in patients with amalgam restorations. It was shown that the main effect of fields led to the appearance of thermoelectromagnetic convection, which is responsible for the enhancement of the diffusion process, grain boundary migration and vacancy formation resulting in microleakage."
See:
formatting link

As far as I know there is no electrolysis, or "galvanic activity", involved in thermoelectromagnetic convection phenomena.
I'd say that this study proves beyond any doubt that, just like all the rest of the metallic materials in the universe, metal amalgam dental fillings really do have electromagnetic properties, even if the established dental profession still maintains the habit of ignoring these properties whenever it can.
It has been demonstrated that amalgam dental fillings generate electrical potentials with magnitudes of up to 350 millivolts - see
formatting link

It has also been demonstrated that amalgam potentials of this magnitude arise even when the fillings are NOT IN CONTACT WITH ANY SALIVA - see
formatting link

However, even though it is possible to routinely measure amalgam potentials using a cheap hand-operated volt-meter (see
formatting link
), it appears that experiments have still not been caried out in order to determine the degree to which these potentials are able to dissipate electrical energy through the nerves in people's heads.
The use of amalgams in dentistry was established long before anyone even knew what an electron was; and it was quickly followed by the rise to prominence of psychiatric "medicine" in our societies.
It seems eminently possible that, since it has been making judgements from a position of ignorance in these matters for all these years, the established dental profession has failed to recognise that the real cause of much of the so-called "psychiatric" and/or "neurological" disfunction in our populations is the effect of the electrical behavior of amalgam dental fillings on the neurological system (search Google Groups for "150 years of electric batteries in people's teeth").
Does anyone disagree?
Remember that, although it is the natural function of the human neurologiocal system to transmit electrical signals via nerve tissue, it is not the natural function of the human neurological system to be permanently dissipating the electrical potentials generated by amalgam fillings in teeth.
And don't forget, there is no electrolysis involved.
Keith P Walsh
PS "Enquiries Concerning The Electrical Properties of Dental Amalgams" can be found at:
formatting link

Reply to
Jan Drew
.
including metal plates, pins or
Bob, you are showing your dishonesty.
Now, for the whole quote:
Because of the potential hazard imposed by the presence of ferromagnetic metals, patients with implanted metallic objects are excluded from MRI.
Reply to
Jan Drew
Key word is "suggests" Carole. That is as iffy as one can get.
You don't understand what the word "suggests" means Carole. It certainly doesn't mean "proves beyond a doubt".
After you look up the meanings of "proves" and "suggests" Look up what Electromagnetic means.
Wrong! Just because you find it one the net doesn't make it true.
"there appears to be no reliable scientific information available to indicate whether or not this is the case"
The same Citation applies Carole.
And this person should learn to read Dutch.
Learn to read, Carole. Please.
Reply to
Bob Officer
including metal plates, pins or
Citing the full line or not is not a sign of dishonesty, jan. because it didn't change the meaning or modify the point I was making.
Carole just doesn't read or understand what she has read.
she much like you, jan.
Reply to
Bob Officer
I'm guessing here that you are not familiar with how nerves actually work. They are not simple conductors. A neuron has an inherent polarization (potential difference) between the inside and outside of its cell membrane, which it actively maintains via ion pumps. This maintenance is the major energy expenditure of the neuron, especially if the neuron is active (see below).
If the extracellular potential changes enough to depolarize the main cell body of the neuron, it causes an "action potential", a momentary breakdown of the membrane that propagates along the length of the neuron through the long "tail" or axon. Then the membrane recovers and the ion pumps restore the polarization.
At the end of the axon are synapses, where the arriving depolarization wave causes little bags (vesicles) of transmitter chemicals to be released onto receptive regions of the next neuron in the system. The chemicals cause local depolarization in that next neuron, and if enough synapses are activated on it, it too will depolarize enough to fire an action potential. The process repeats through a chain of neurons. Eventually, the signal reaches the brain and (in the case of tooth neurons) it is interpreted as pain.
My point here is that if the supposed amalgam voltage actually causes neurons to fire, then we'd feel something. If not, then there is nothing "dissipated" by the nervous system, except perhaps a slight increase in the the activity of the ion pumps of the first neuron in the chain... nothing propagates farther up the chain.
The increase in ion pump activity of that first neuron would be very small, compared to an actual action potential discharge where the whole neuron has to be recharged. But if it was significant to the cell, which I seriously doubt, then the cell would simply respond by providing more mitochondria (the energy sources for the ion pumps) to maintain the status quo. No problem.
Best regards,
Bob Masta DAQARTA v6.02 Data AcQuisition And Real-Time Analysis
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Reply to
Bob Masta
Yes. I do not believe it either.
Ditto.
CAVE! They observed the effects of an MRI apparatus, which is ... a strong magnetic field.
Reply to
Happy Oyster

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