Research Study Detects Thermoelectromagnetic Convection in Amalgam Fillings



A scientific study carried out by researchers in Iran and published by the Journal of DentoMaxilloFacial Radiology has reported thermoelectromagnetic convection effects in amalgam dental fillings when subjected to MRI scanning.
The abstract from the report concludes:
"The results of this study suggest that MRI is not a completely safe technique in patients with amalgam restorations. It was shown that the main effect of fields led to the appearance of thermoelectromagnetic convection, which is responsible for the enhancement of the diffusion process, grain boundary migration and vacancy formation resulting in microleakage."
See: http://dmfr.birjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/38/7/470
As far as I know there is no electrolysis, or "galvanic activity", involved in thermoelectromagnetic convection phenomena.
I'd say that this study proves beyond any doubt that, just like all the rest of the metallic materials in the universe, metal amalgam dental fillings really do have electromagnetic properties, even if the established dental profession still maintains the habit of ignoring these properties whenever it can.
It has been demonstrated that amalgam dental fillings generate electrical potentials with magnitudes of up to 350 millivolts - see http://book.boot.users.btopenworld.com/dutch.htm
It has also been demonstrated that amalgam potentials of this magnitude arise even when the fillings are NOT IN CONTACT WITH ANY SALIVA - see http://book.boot.users.btopenworld.com/1952__paper.html
However, even though it is possible to routinely measure amalgam potentials using a cheap hand-operated volt-meter (see http://book.boot.users.btopenworld.com/potentials.htm ), it appears that experiments have still not been caried out in order to determine the degree to which these potentials are able to dissipate electrical energy through the nerves in people's heads.
The use of amalgams in dentistry was established long before anyone even knew what an electron was; and it was quickly followed by the rise to prominence of psychiatric "medicine" in our societies.
It seems eminently possible that, since it has been making judgements from a position of ignorance in these matters for all these years, the established dental profession has failed to recognise that the real cause of much of the so-called "psychiatric" and/or "neurological" disfunction in our populations is the effect of the electrical behavior of amalgam dental fillings on the neurological system (search Google Groups for "150 years of electric batteries in people's teeth").
Does anyone disagree?
Remember that, although it is the natural function of the human neurologiocal system to transmit electrical signals via nerve tissue, it is not the natural function of the human neurological system to be permanently dissipating the electrical potentials generated by amalgam fillings in teeth.
And don't forget, there is no electrolysis involved.
Keith P Walsh
PS "Enquiries Concerning The Electrical Properties of Dental Amalgams" can be found at: http://book.boot.users.btopenworld.com/intro.htm
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On Thu, 20 Oct 2011 20:14:24 -0700 (PDT), in misc.health.alternative,

Key word is "suggests" Carole. That is as iffy as one can get.

You don't understand what the word "suggests" means Carole. It certainly doesn't mean "proves beyond a doubt".
After you look up the meanings of "proves" and "suggests" Look up what Electromagnetic means.

Wrong! Just because you find it one the net doesn't make it true.
<Cite from the above URL> "there appears to be no reliable scientific information available to indicate whether or not this is the case" <cite>

The same Citation applies Carole.
And this person should learn to read Dutch.
Learn to read, Carole. Please.
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Bob Officer

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On Thu, 20 Oct 2011 20:14:24 -0700 (PDT), Jan Drew

I'm guessing here that you are not familiar with how nerves actually work. They are not simple conductors. A neuron has an inherent polarization (potential difference) between the inside and outside of its cell membrane, which it actively maintains via ion pumps. This maintenance is the major energy expenditure of the neuron, especially if the neuron is active (see below).
If the extracellular potential changes enough to depolarize the main cell body of the neuron, it causes an "action potential", a momentary breakdown of the membrane that propagates along the length of the neuron through the long "tail" or axon. Then the membrane recovers and the ion pumps restore the polarization.
At the end of the axon are synapses, where the arriving depolarization wave causes little bags (vesicles) of transmitter chemicals to be released onto receptive regions of the next neuron in the system. The chemicals cause local depolarization in that next neuron, and if enough synapses are activated on it, it too will depolarize enough to fire an action potential. The process repeats through a chain of neurons. Eventually, the signal reaches the brain and (in the case of tooth neurons) it is interpreted as pain.
My point here is that if the supposed amalgam voltage actually causes neurons to fire, then we'd feel something. If not, then there is nothing "dissipated" by the nervous system, except perhaps a slight increase in the the activity of the ion pumps of the first neuron in the chain... nothing propagates farther up the chain.
The increase in ion pump activity of that first neuron would be very small, compared to an actual action potential discharge where the whole neuron has to be recharged. But if it was significant to the cell, which I seriously doubt, then the cell would simply respond by providing more mitochondria (the energy sources for the ion pumps) to maintain the status quo. No problem.
Best regards,
Bob Masta DAQARTA v6.02 Data AcQuisition And Real-Time Analysis www.daqarta.com Scope, Spectrum, Spectrogram, Sound Level Meter Frequency Counter, FREE Signal Generator Pitch Track, Pitch-to-MIDI Science with your sound card!
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wrote:
Parrot!
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Peter Khlmann has spoken. Is this his pic?:
http://www.thebuzzmedia.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/06/attention_whore4.jpg
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On 15/10/2011 4:09 PM, Jos Bergervoet wrote:

Yes, but dark matter doesn't. ;)
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On 10/15/2011 11:56 PM, ~buttercup~ wrote:

Right! So this scientific study carried out by researchers in Iran has now, for the first time, established that dental fillings are not consisting of dark matter.
One less dark matter candidate.. We're closing in!
--
Jos

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What is the deleterious effect from MRI that isn't safe?
I imagine the same effect would apply to anybody with any type of metal including metal plates, pins or screws.
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On Fri, 21 Oct 2011 10:13:47 +1100, in misc.health.alternative,

You didn't read the article did you Carole.
<Cite from the above URL> "patients with implanted metallic objects are excluded from MRI." </cite>
Carole scores a *** Zero ****for reading comprehension, again.
Anyone spend the 15 dollars for the full article? I wonder about Time/rate/flux field figures.
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.
Bob, you are showing your dishonesty.
Now, for the whole quote:
Because of the potential hazard imposed by the presence of ferromagnetic metals, patients with implanted metallic objects are excluded from MRI.
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On Thu, 20 Oct 2011 20:25:33 -0700 (PDT), in misc.health.alternative,

Citing the full line or not is not a sign of dishonesty, jan. because it didn't change the meaning or modify the point I was making.
Carole just doesn't read or understand what she has read.
she much like you, jan.
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Bob Officer
jan Describes herself and posting style.
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On Wed, 12 Oct 2011 04:37:33 -0700 (PDT), Keith P Walsh

Oh, crap. Do not eat spinach. It contains iron.
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