Electromagnetic Energy in Dental Amalgams

The website of electronic equipment manufacturer Gore Electronics makes
the following assertion regarding the electromagnetic properties of
materials:
"If you can describe the permittivity, permeability and conductivity of
a material, you can describe completely how electromagnetic energy
behaves within that material."
See:
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In view of the fact that metal amalgam dental fillings are placed in
children's teeth, and in view of the fact that individuals are subjected
to different types of electromagnetic energy every day, you would have
thought that at sometime someone somewhere should have carried out
experimental investigations to determine the permittivity, permeability
and conductivity of dental amalgam in order to "describe completely how
electromagnetic energy behaves within that material."
(Well I would at least.)
Does anyone know of any reason why it should not be possible to describe
completely how electromagnetic energy behaves within metal amalgam
dental fillings?
Keith P Walsh
PS, some enquiries concerning the electrical properties of dental
amalgams can be found at:
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Reply to
Keith P Walsh
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I went through college doing Electronics. We used to do simple experiments to determine these properties as part of our course. Its not rocket science and takes less than an afternoon with simple equipment..
However - the properties for copper are well known and documented. Holding to your head - or a copper coin or a copper antenna emmissing megawatts of microwave energy may have very different effects. These properties are trivial compared with the geometry and topography of the material. EG you can make a copper lightning rod or a high voltage transformer from the same copper chunk. One could make 35,000 volts and the other save your life by being a lightning conductor.
I think its a bit like describing the properties of fibreglass. Its dangerousness might depend on wether its in a missile nose cone or in a fishing rod. Not that its fibreglass.
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Reply to
John Chewter
Thank you for your "reply".
Do you know of any reason why it should not be possible to describe completely how electromagnetic energy behaves within metal amalgam dental fillings?
Keith P Walsh
Reply to
Keith P Walsh
REPLY
No physics course is complete without measuring amalgams -- According to Keith its 350 millivolts ..........
....... or 100,000 amalgams ,,, according to Keith again .....
Reply to
Joel M. Eichen D.D.S.
The absolute funniest part of the post is in the HEADER!
Re: Electromagnetic Energy in Dental Amalgams
If an amalgam is composed of matter, it contains electromagnetic energy!
JOEL
Reply to
Joel M. Eichen D.D.S.
Completely? What does completely mean in this context? It would depend up the exact recipe for that particulat lump of it, its shape, size, which direction the guy way facing, proximity to other filling, braces, sunglasses, the guys, the individual body makeup, how much is he salivating, position on the globe, what he last ate.........
I guess you could completely descripe an individual filling in an individual context.
What is the point here? Life is too short for this.
Pauses while Jan Drew sharpens her pencil...........
Reply to
John Chewter
he won't go away until he realizes that his repeated postings on here will never make any progress in the state of dentistry in the real world. he can ask his questions as many times as he wants, but there is no one on here who can make a difference. these groups are populated by argumentative scientist wannabes picking nits over nothing, clueless high school dropouts with dreams of becoming the next Einstein pushing their latest crackpot theory that was debunked 50 years ago, doom and destruction mongers like Walsh who are trying to drag the rest of the world down to their dungeon with groundless claims and arguments, and trolls just hoping to drag anyone into another endless discussion about nothing(Walsh will move to this group shortly if he isn't here already).
Reply to
Dave
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Is there any particular reason you haven't gotten off your ass and done the necessary work yourself? If you insist on continuing to try to recruit others to your crusade, a little evidence would help.
Mark L. Fergerson
Reply to
Mark Fergerson
REPLY
This was the website that George Costanza did import for ... only import, no export .............
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Reply to
Joel M. Eichen D.D.S.
I can offer an example of one context in which our knowledge of the electromagnetic properties of dental amalgams might be considered incomplete.
The website of UK company Microshield makes repeated references to adverse effects reported by users of mobile phones (cell phones in the US) implicating the interaction between the electromagnetic energy radiating from the phones and the metal fillings in the users' teeth.
e.g., "Many mobile (cell phone) users report burning sensations and toothache in teeth with fillings and also an unpleasant metallic taste in their mouth."
See:
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In order to discredit the veracity of such reports scientifically it might be considered necessary to have some knowledge of the behavior of metal amalgam dental fillings with regard to their interaction with electromagnetic energy.
For example, it might be necessary to establish that amalgam fillings are not able to attenuate electromagnetic signals at the frequencies used by cell phones, or that any energy which is absorbed by the fillings could not be dissipated to their surroundings in the form of an electric current.
These things can only be done by measuring the electromagnetic behavior of the material in question.
However, if experimental studies to determine the permeability, permittivity and conductivity of amalgams have never been carried out then the relevant properties of the material are not known, and it might therefore not be possible to discredit reports such as those quoted above with any degree of scientific authority.
It should require a complete description of the electromagnetic behavior of the material in order to do this.
Amalgam fillings are placed in children's teeth.
Keith P Walsh
PS, further enquiries regarding the electrical properties of dental amalgams can be found at:
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Reply to
Keith P Walsh
"Keith P Walsh"> .................
Keith those MicroShields seem a little pricey. Have you bought one yet or do you still just put a bucket over your head when using your cell phone?
carabelli
Reply to
carabelli

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