Testing Carbon steels

Hi all,
I have a problem to nut out. Aisi1010 and Aisi1050 have been mixed up and need to be seperated. Is there some sort of magnetic testing device
that could be used to tell the differance between the two types of steel? (This is a univesity thing) Surly this is done in the world. I just cannot see why a rig that can generate an emf then measure that emf, and use the signel to differencate between types of steel.
Cheers Cynabar
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The only "magnetic" way that I can think about is test these steels for Ms temperature with magnetic pos/neg feedback device. It's not pretty common test and is used mostly in research (you have to have sample surrounded by magnetic coil "suspended" in furnace/"cooler" altogether with mentioned sample). IMHO the best way to solve the problem is to cut off pieces than heat both of the samples to ~1600 deg F, keep'em there for 1 hour, than straight from that temp. quench them in a water to room temp. Now, after all of that whichever of the samples look harder (scratch test of something, try to scratch one of the samples agains other) that is 1050.
--
melon



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
cynabar wrote:

Are the pieces all the same size and shape? If not, comparing magnetic properties could be a problem.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Testing Carbon steels Group: sci.materials Date: Sat, Aug 27, 2005, 9:27pm (EDT-3) From: snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (cynabar)

....
You've probably already thought of this, but just in case.... _If_ you can afford to mar one surface of each piece, I think a 'spark test' on a bench grinder would differentiate 1010 from 1050. You might try a google search for the term if it's unfamiliar.
The test can be videoed, to keep the marred area very small, then the spark pattern anaysis done afterward from the video.
Jim, "Entropy never sleeps; do y'all?
The above address is invalid; send email to fesser at same domain name.
http://community.webtv.net/IronDuff/SpringBreak http://community.webtv.net/a968/ContinentalDivide http://community.webtv.net/a968/TennentMountain
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
http://www.innov-xsys.com /
They manufacture a hand-held X-ray flourescence spectrometer that will accurately measure the composition of just about any alloy you can think of (Fe, Ni, Al, or Ti-based, to name a few), in about 5 seconds flat. Point the "gun" at the metal's surface, hit the trigger, and a few seconds later it tells you the composition, and AISI designation (if applicable) of the alloy. Buy, lease, or rent, depending on the quantity you need to sort.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
There might be a problem with this. The analyzer does not check for carbon, the primary difference between the two. It will do Mn but since the ranges between 1010 and 1050 are .30/.60 and .60/.90 there could be some overlap considering check tolerances. The spark test is probably your best bet.
brian stahl wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
My mistake; I thought they had improved their system since the last time I used one to include light elements.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

There are "portable" spectrometers that will detect carbon. A sorting bridge might help if the parts are a simple shape (bar) and similar pieces of known chemistry are available. The best thing to do though if you do not have suitable equipment to hand, is probably to bin the material and start again.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thanks Everyone who has provided these solutions.
Cheers Cynabar
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.