The Difference Between an Alloy and an Amalgam - It's Thermoelectric!

wrote:


Like I said, it's a common misconception.
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wrote:

It was not dereacted or dedissolved.

a composite

More unhappy than, say, piezoelctric chewing effects within the CEJ?
-Aut
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whether or not = whether or not whether

Is human tissva a superconductor--in the relevant band? That is, not in the picovolts-microvolts of the nuclear radio and aqveose ionic background, but in the millivolts of lone metals, which the human body is not?

Yes. And reception doesn't happen either.

That's a cretinose argument for thome who can't add. If there's a damping mekanism for stronger signals, the output still must show up somewhere.

A static magnetic field is itself born of elctric currend, and would need to feed another body to make another, and no longer stay static.

Which I like to call IC (AC + DC), intermittent currend, with one sign and on one side of the baseline.
[snip]

It was pap.
[snip]
wrote:

whether or not = whether or not whether

Is human tissva a superconductor--in the relevant band? That is, not in the picovolts-microvolts of the nuclear radio and aqveose ionic background, but in the millivolts of lone metals, which the human body is not?

Yes. And reception doesn't happen either.

That's a cretinose argument for thome who can't add. If there's a damping mekanism for stronger signals, the output still must show up somewhere.

A static magnetic field is itself born of elctric currend, and would need to feed another body to make another, and no longer stay static.

Which I like to call IC (AC + DC), intermittent currend, with one sign and on one side of the baseline.
[snip]

It was pap.
[snip]
-Aut
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I am proposing the hypothesis that the degree of electromagnetic disturbance caused by the application of a temperature gradient to an amalgam should be greater than that caused by the application of a temperature gradient to either a pure metal or a true alloy.
The justification for this proposal is based on the fact that an amalgam has a much greater degree of material inhomogeneity than either a pure metal or an alloy, and it should therefore be expected to generate internal thermoelectric eddy currents to a much greater extent when subjected to thermal gradients.
Now, Professor Wang of the University of Akron has asserted that the relevant "coupling parameter", which gives an indication of the size of the electromagnetic disturbance generated by a material with respect to the size of any temperature differential applied to it, would be too low in "most metals" to suggest that any local electromagnetic effect produced could have an influence on neurological tissue in the direct vicinity of the material.
However, as I have shown (and I note that in your own contribution you have not registered any disagreement with this point) amalgams (including dental amalgams) are different from "most metals" in the crucial respect that they have a much greater degree of material inhomogeneity.
So, the question is, how can we be sure that amalgams (and most importantly dental amalgams) come within the "safe" range defined by Professor Wang with regard to electromagnetic activity?
Well there's only one scientific way to do that and that is to carry out experimental investigations to see if the electromagnetic disturbances generated by amalgams as a result of their thermoelectric behavior can be measured.
And if they can be measured then it would also be necessary to carry out further experimental investigations to determine whether or not the measured disturbances are able to influence the function of any neurological tissue nearby.
According to the established principles of scientific understanding, without any of the experimental investigations here described having been carried out, it is not possible for any of us (including Professor Wang) to conclude whether or not the natural electromagnetic behavior of an amalgam dental filling is capable of dissipating electrical energy through the nerves in people's heads.
And it is therefore not possile to declare amalgam fillings "safe" in this respect.
I do not advocate the use of metal amalgams in restorative dentistry.
Professional bodies such as the American Dental Association, the British Dental Association, the US FDA, etc., they do that. And therefore the responsibility for carrying out the experimental procedures to demonstrate whether or not such materials are "safe" for this purpose lies with them, not with me.
Now I appreciate that you have succeeded in convincing yourself that this responsibility does lie with me.
But you are wrong, it doesn't.
Keith P Walsh
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Keith P Walsh wrote, On 1/30/2009 3:41 AM:

Mr Walsh, Why would you trust the results from any experiments carried out by the ADA, the BDA, or the FDA? Do the experiment yourself and then you will know for sure whether your hypothesis is correct.
If your experiment has any sort of positive result, then other researchers will be come interested in the phenomenon and begin their own investigations. Then the ADA and the BDA will be forced to take notice!
You could be a hero! All you have to do is a little work.
Best of luck Paul O.
--

Paul D Oosterhout
I work for SAIC (but I don't speak for SAIC)
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I'll bear it in mind.
In the meantime can I take it that you agree with my description of the difference between an alloy and an amalgam?
Keith P Walsh
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Keith P Walsh wrote, On 1/31/2009 3:30 AM:

Yes I do. But It do not agree that you will find any significant thermoelectric effect across an thermal gradient in an amalgam. Do the experiment and find out for yourself.
--

Paul D Oosterhout
I work for SAIC (but I don't speak for SAIC)
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