Circuit Design Better & Cheaper In India

Not that anyone ever believed our confederacy of dunces ever did anything . . .
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New Report: 30 Million Service Jobs May Be Shipped Overseas

by James Parks, Jan 23, 2009
Recent telecommunications advances, especially the Internet, could theoretically put more than 30 million U.S. jobs at risk of being exported overseas. Services previously needed to be performed domestically theoretically can be done anywhere in the world through the Internet, four U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) analysts say in an article appearing in the agency’s Monthly Labor Review (subscription required).
The 160 occupations considered capable of being performed in other countries account for some 30.3 million workers, one-fifth of total U.S. employment and cover a wide array of job functions, pay rates and educational levels.
More than half of the vulnerable jobs in the BLS study are professional and related occupations, including computer and mathematical science occupations and architecture and engineering jobs, and many office and administrative support occupations also are considered susceptible.
Since 2000, corporations have shipped more than 525,000 white-collar overseas, according to the AFL-CIO Department for Professional Employees (DPE). Some estimates say up to 14 million middle-class jobs could be exported out of our nation in the next 10 years. Accountants, software engineers, X-ray technicians, all are losing their jobs as corporations look for low-wage workers in countries such as India and China.
Meanwhile, the jobs being created in the United States often are low- wage jobs that don’t offer health coverage or ensure retirement security. Nearly one-quarter of the nation’s workers labor in jobs that generally pay less than the $8.85 hourly wage the U.S. government says it takes to keep a family of four out of poverty. Sixty percent of such workers are women, and many are people of color.
Among the occupations most susceptible to being sent overseas, the BLS analysts say, are those that produce information and do not require “face-to-face” contact. Among the most vulnerable are office and administrative support jobs, with relatively low education or training requirements, including telephone operators, payroll and timekeeping clerks, and word processors and typists.
Another 11 of the highest ranked jobs are professional and related occupations, which generally possess higher educational requirements. They include pharmacists, computer programmers, biochemists and biophysicists, architectural and civil drafters, financial analysts, paralegals and legal assistants.
Among the occupations least likely to be shipped overseas are financial managers, food scientists and technologists, front-line retail sales managers, and training and development specialists.
http://blog.aflcio.org/2009/01/23/new-report-30-million-service-jobs -...
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Bret Cahill wrote:

<snip> Not one word to back up your use of "Better" in the subject line, because it's simply not true. Product quality is garbage now.
My daughters bouncer collapsed when she was using it. At the time, she weighed 35 pounds and the max weight stated by the manufacturer was 50 pounds. Yet, somehow, the the thing litterally broke over the front "legs". The "importer" (you can't really call them a manufacturer if they don't really make anything) never heard of such a problem, but they sure don't seem to sell that model anymore. They were nice enough to offer us WHOLESALE cost if we'd send them the evidence. Payable after they receive the product back. Not very generous considering that she could have really hurt herself by smacking her face on something other than the carpeted floor.
She also owns a cool math toy that never fails to speak the wrong answers, glad I noticed before she developed psychological problems from it. Amazon ate that one and just sent another one to us without requiring a return. They didn't even want it back. Both of these products were from a company with a really big name. Big enough that I won't mention it as I have better things to do with my life than to defend the truth in court.
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Not that anyone ever believed our confederacy of dunces ever did anything . . .
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
New Report: 30 Million Service Jobs May Be Shipped Overseas
by James Parks, Jan 23, 2009
Recent telecommunications advances, especially the Internet, could theoretically put more than 30 million U.S. jobs at risk of being exported overseas. Services previously needed to be performed domestically theoretically can be done anywhere in the world through the Internet, four U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) analysts say in an article appearing in the agency’s Monthly Labor Review (subscription required).
The 160 occupations considered capable of being performed in other countries account for some 30.3 million workers, one-fifth of total U.S. employment and cover a wide array of job functions, pay rates and educational levels.
More than half of the vulnerable jobs in the BLS study are professional and related occupations, including computer and mathematical science occupations and architecture and engineering jobs, and many office and administrative support occupations also are considered susceptible.
Since 2000, corporations have shipped more than 525,000 white-collar overseas, according to the AFL-CIO Department for Professional Employees (DPE). Some estimates say up to 14 million middle-class jobs could be exported out of our nation in the next 10 years. Accountants, software engineers, X-ray technicians, all are losing their jobs as corporations look for low-wage workers in countries such as India and China.
Meanwhile, the jobs being created in the United States often are low- wage jobs that don’t offer health coverage or ensure retirement security. Nearly one-quarter of the nation’s workers labor in jobs that generally pay less than the $8.85 hourly wage the U.S. government says it takes to keep a family of four out of poverty. Sixty percent of such workers are women, and many are people of color.
Among the occupations most susceptible to being sent overseas, the BLS analysts say, are those that produce information and do not require “face-to-face” contact. Among the most vulnerable are office and administrative support jobs, with relatively low education or training requirements, including telephone operators, payroll and timekeeping clerks, and word processors and typists.
Another 11 of the highest ranked jobs are professional and related occupations, which generally possess higher educational requirements. They include pharmacists, computer programmers, biochemists and biophysicists, architectural and civil drafters, financial analysts, paralegals and legal assistants.
Among the occupations least likely to be shipped overseas are financial managers, food scientists and technologists, front-line retail sales managers, and training and development specialists.
http://blog.aflcio.org/2009/01/23/new-report-30-million-service-jobs -...
Personally I think we need to re-think free trade. I think it is fine at some level but as it begins to undermine critical industries and professions some level of protection is in order to insure the US maintains critical skills and a robust standard of living. It's absurd to constantly be running the race to the bottom so that Americans eventually live in shanties like in China and India and make pauper wages. One solution might be tariffs and taxes to give advantage to hiring American. A company would be free to do what they wanted but to sell into the American market, they would have to have a certain number of Americans in their work force. Those that did not hire Americans would be taxed accordingly to sell here.
Many corporations do not even pay taxes these days because of loop holes that allow moving their operations off shore. Under my scheme they would pay taxes and or tariffs to sell into the American market regardless of location. Certain non critical industries might be exempt from this while other industries could bargain with reciprocal trade. Under this idea, we would buy tariff free from them and they buy equal value tariff free from us. Both would maintain their own labor forces.
It's time to rethink this idiotic notion that "free trade" is good for everyone. That clearly is not the case.
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If you don't like globalized communication / information / money transfers you'll need to move to another . . . well . . . another universe.
Even spiraling fuel prices will not stop globalization of products. It costs $700 to ship a 20 ton container from China to Europe.
That's 0.00015 pennies/pound-mile
One third of a cent/ton mile
Our only hope is to start thinking outside the box.
Bret Cahill
There's going to be a leveling between rich and poor and between rich and poor nations.
-- Louis Gerstner CEO of IBM
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snip...
Bret Cahill
There's going to be a leveling between rich and poor and between rich and poor nations.
-- Louis Gerstner CEO of IBM
Uh Huh! And who is going to buy Mr. Gerstner's computers when we are all living in shanties?
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com says...>

...even if it requires that the UN reduce the level of the "rich" down to that of the "poor" to accomplish those ends, eh comrade?
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