The difference between scale & gauge USA

Examiner.com
1st September 2009
Matt Conrad
" One of the most confusing things for newcomers to model railroading
is the difference between "scale" and "gauge." They are often used
interchangeably, but this usage is incorrect. The two terms are
totally different concepts. Both terms have different meanings outside
the realms of models and railroads, as well. This article will be
restricted to modeling and railroading as far as that goes. "
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Reply to
Dragon Heart
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Yeah, well, I do find the UK/European habit of using "gauge" to mean "scale" a little, um, odd. Occasionally quite funny. Such as "16 mm narrow gauge" for 2ft narrow gauge on O gauge track (or 3ft narrow gauge of 45mm gauge.) I have to remind myself that the writer intends "16 mm scale", or 1:38. An odd scale, if there ever was one. But they sure do nice work
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. :-)
Cheers, wolf k.
Reply to
Wolf K
Us Europeans have it right! 16mm means nothing without addition of the gauge - 16mm models can run on any gauge track the user fancies (they might have to scratch build if want narrow or broad gauge. 0 gauge means 7mm to the foot on 32mm gauge so is quite specific, but does really need qualifying, i.e. 0-FS, to be pedantic to nail down track and wheel standards.
Cheers Richard
Reply to
beamends
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As that is American It will couse even more confustion Not just O=3D 6.5 = instead of 7 mm And no 4 mm scale just oo Trev O14
Reply to
Trev
"beamends" wrote
It can get even more confusing - in some branches of modelling, the measurement refers to the height of the average miniature human figure. In those areas 16mm scale would refer to a figure 16mm high.
Whilst in railway modelling terms, O-gauge has different scales in the UK & the USA. Here O-scale is 7mm:1ft (1:43.5) whereas in the USA it pans out around 1/4":1ft (1:48)
John.
Reply to
John Turner
"John Turner" wrote in news:NtKdnTNQCLt2-T snipped-for-privacy@supernews.com:
Which would be a very unusual scale indeed as figures are usually produced in 6mm, 15mm, 25mm, 28mm and 76mm for the very rich :-)
Hi John, long time no speak.
Reply to
Chris Wilson
"Chris Wilson" wrote
All jibberish to me, but I've got a box full of figures, none of which really match those sizes, except perhaps a couple of American O-scale chappies (around 23mm) who populate my fledgling On30 layout. :-)
John.
Reply to
John Turner
"John Turner" wrote in news:EvKdndVQCf5- snipped-for-privacy@supernews.com:
Work, work and more work ... for the past year it's been a case of "If I'm awake I'm at work" :-(
Oh and a lot of gardening for SWHTBO, I've been told that once I have the decking, new fence, new pond all finished, the hedges trimmed, the fruit trees pruned, the veg beds cleared out, the flower beds mulched I can "go and play trains" grrrrrr
Oops almost forgot, hallway, stairs and landing all have to be decorated as well.
Reply to
Chris Wilson
Fair enough.
LOL! My SWMBO does all that, trained at horticultural college. Comes from short welsh stock and has a much better shovel technique than lanky old me.
She does that too. Sometimes without telling me first.
I STILL don't get enough time to play trains, though.
MBQ
Reply to
Man at B&Q

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