crack in copper

Hi, I need to test a copper bar at the bottom of this bar to see if we have a crack into the weld (weld by friction)
Do you have any idea ? (we have to test a bar every 20 sec.)
it's a 4 x 4 in bar by 8 ft long.
Yves Rossignol
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Dear Yves Rossignol:

have
Ultrasound. The reflected, received pulse will be a function of the continuity of the material.
David A. Smith
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Dear Yves Rossignol:

test
into
It will require something other than what you have installed in water.
On AltaVista Advanced Search using the boolean argument: ultrasound and defect and metal and crack
I get 558 hits that are along the lines of what you seek to do.
If you simply hammer a rod (the same way for each sample) and record *all* the harmonics, and compare it to a "perfect rods" sample, you can perhaps achieve the same effect. An odd high harmonic, and/or an early return might be an indication of a problem.
Other posters might have simpler suggestions...
David A. Smith
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The coupling liquid for ultrasound doesn't absolutely have to be water.
You could use gasoline or some other liquid with a flash point well below the temperature of the molten metal.
That way, any trace of the liquid ignites and flares away before it actually touches the metal, eliminating the steam splash problem.
And maybe introducing other problems of its own, but every silver lining has its cloud. ;-)
-Mike-
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