vibration - need a non-engineering explaination

I'm looking for a textbook or paper(s) which explains vibration, fundamental
frequency (s), harmonics, and modes in non-engineering terms. I do not need
all the mathematical background. The problem is that these concepts need
explained to a group of people who have no engineering or physics
background.
Reply to
Alan Krem, Krem Speed Equipment
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try using analogies. hmm comparing vibrations as bumps on the road. and harmonics as hmm hills. i mean may be using simple analogies of every day might help
good luck -- Hasta Luego
Irshaad (Faster than Bruce Lee)
remove the X to reply snipped-for-privacy@softhome.net
"Alan Krem, Krem Speed Equipment" wrote in message news:3f36409c snipped-for-privacy@corp.newsgroups.com... > I'm looking for a textbook or paper(s) which explains vibration, fundamental > frequency (s), harmonics, and modes in non-engineering terms. I do not need > all the mathematical background. The problem is that these concepts need > explained to a group of people who have no engineering or physics > background. > > > > >
Reply to
Irshaad
I think you can get a start with these texts:
Schaum's Outline Series, Theory and Problems of Mechanical Vibrations, William W. Seto, McGraw-Hill, ISBN 07-056327-6 The first chapter gives a very brief explanation with a few examples. College Outline Series, Physics Problems and How to Solve Them, Clarence E. Bennett, Barnes & Noble See chapters 6 and 8
These are still engineering oriented, but may help with a simplified explanation. Try a Slinky to demonstrate. I think the plastic ones are better Try several identical drinking glasses with various levels of water. Try a length of clothes (?) line rope.
Jim Y
Alan Krem, Krem Speed Equipment wrote in message news:3f36409c snipped-for-privacy@corp.newsgroups.com... > I'm looking for a textbook or paper(s) which explains vibration, fundamental > frequency (s), harmonics, and modes in non-engineering terms. I do not need > all the mathematical background. The problem is that these concepts need > explained to a group of people who have no engineering or physics > background. > > > > >
Reply to
Jim Y
Thanks to all that had suggestions. The examples will work well and I believe the Schaum's Outline Series may provide the less technical terms.
> I think you can get a start with these texts: > > Schaum's Outline Series, Theory and Problems of Mechanical Vibrations, > William W. Seto, McGraw-Hill, ISBN 07-056327-6 > The first chapter gives a very brief explanation with a few examples. > College Outline Series, Physics Problems and How to Solve Them, Clarence E. > Bennett, Barnes & Noble > See chapters 6 and 8 > > These are still engineering oriented, but may help with a simplified > explanation. > Try a Slinky to demonstrate. I think the plastic ones are better > Try several identical drinking glasses with various levels of water. > Try a length of clothes (?) line rope. > > Jim Y > > > Alan Krem, Krem Speed Equipment wrote in > message news:3f36409c snipped-for-privacy@corp.newsgroups.com... > > I'm looking for a textbook or paper(s) which explains vibration, > fundamental > > frequency (s), harmonics, and modes in non-engineering terms. I do not > need > > all the mathematical background. The problem is that these concepts need > > explained to a group of people who have no engineering or physics > > background. > > > > > > > > > >
Reply to
Alan Krem, Krem Speed Equipment
I highly recommend the following book for a qualitative explanation:
Vibration by R. E. D. Bishop
It is out-of-print, but Amazon has a used one for sale.
In addition, I have posted some vibration articles at:
formatting link
Tom Irvine
Reply to
Tom Irvine

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