Carbon Monoxide

Is Carbon Monoxide flammable? Is that what causes the flame in enogas (when used in electric furace)?

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Leonard Brick wrote:

Yes. It is used in blast furnance technology.
Michael Dahms
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Carbon monoxide (CO) is an odorless, colorless gas that interferes with the delivery of oxygen in the blood to the rest of the body. It is produced by the incomplete combustion of fuels. The flame you see from Endothermic gas is there because Endo is roughly 40% Hydrogen which IS flamable. The Balance is roughly 40% Nitrogen and 20 % CO. Nitrogen and CO are NOT Flamable

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Sorry should have read,
"bobbCarbon monoxide (CO) is an odorless, colorless gas that interferes with the delivery of oxygen in the blood to the rest of the body. It is produced by the incomplete combustion of fuels. The flame you see from Endothermic gas is there because Endo is roughly 40% Hydrogen which IS flamable. The Balance is roughly 40% Nitrogen and 20 % CO. Nitrogen is Not Flamable CO is along

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The chemical reaction between carbon and water is the famous 'water gas' reaction in nearly every sophmore chemistry textbook; its product was CO. The reaction was known and named sometime in the 19th century and was practical enough to light the lamps of London of those times.
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