Rh in super alloys

Hi! So rhenium is being used in superalloy turbine blades to improve creep resistance. How rare/expensive is it to use rhenium? Can anyone put
it in context to its neighbour W?
Open discussion on the use of this element. Thanks for your input.
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Re is used in a number of (steel) Super alloys. It is used in the Nickel based ones in 0-6% doses while in the Cobalt base it is only 0-2%.
Conversely W is also in Ni-base at 0-12% while Co-Base at 0-11%.
martin Martin Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net NRA LOH & Endowment Member NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Founder
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Thank you very much Martin. Do you know is there anything exotic about Rh that makes it more difficult to manufacture or use than Co or W alloyed steels? Thank you for the excellent information. Much appreciated.
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Rh forms oxides at 800C or 1470F. RhO2. at 1150C or 2100F a volatile oxide forms. However, it does not tarnish at 'room' temperature even in heavily polluted atmospheres. It is resistant to aqua regia and to most up to about 100C. Wrought forms are limited; products made are via powder metallurgy tech.
Martin
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