Homemade electric load bank

I would like to see if I can easily build a homemade electric load bank, to test generators. To that end, I would like to buy electric
water heating elements, connect them in parallel, with each of them separately switchable, and submerge into a water container. Before power is supplied, I would connect a garden hose and run water through this container (which could even be simply a bucket).
Does this setup make sense?
If so, which heating elements would you suggest?
thanks
i
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Bathroom heaters are much easier. Already got the switchs and the cords.
Electric stove elements might work well too and are designed for open air use.
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wrote:

Thanks. I was at Home Depot today, and saw stove elements, and wondered about the same thing. Some creative use of stove elements, and a fan, could yield great results. Those elements, though, did not have an amp rating. If I test, I will test at 220v.
i
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IIRC they are 1200 and 1500 watts for the small and large ones at 240 volts. Easily available for free from any applaiance store that recycles the old appliances. They can be run at bright red heat but prefer to be kept at lower temps with a fan.
Ignoramus29240 wrote:

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Thanks! I will go this route if I make the load bank.
i

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How many kW do you want to dispose of?
Jim
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5-10.
i
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replying to Ignoramus29240, Jimmy khakis wrote: Your i
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You are making it to complicated! Just use portable heaters, or old electric baseboard strips! Running water and electricity seems like a very bad idea too! You can buy electric heating elements from Graingers. I do generator repair and service on my job. Mostly 10-25K home standby units. If I need to load a generator I just grab some portable heaters from the shop. We have a bunch of them already so they are handy. I also have a cord made with bare wire on one end so I can connect it into the output terminals of the gennerator, and outlets on the other end where I can plug in up to six heaters. With this setup I can load about 10K. Greg
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electric
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No need to bother with the water heaters, radiant, or better still fan blown, heaters work great; I once worked on a site where the 10MW Diesel alternators were load tested into a huge fan cooled 'heater', you risked being cooked by the air blast from them as well as deafened by the DAs and choked by the Diesel smoke; great fun :-) Martin
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Those heaters though, are such that you do not know how much power they use exactly, right?
i
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electric
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The heaters state how many watts they consume. I have checked them with a amp probe and they are close. Are you going to get any idea how much power any heater element uses without an amp probe?? Water heater elements, stove elements, whatever, you will still need an amp probe to be sure of the total load. Do you need to load to a specific amp/watt rating? Seems to me that a generator pretty much works or it does not! In twenty years of servicing generators I never had one that sort of works! I rarely if never load test a generator to check it's output. I just load it down to check voltage and hertz. I will check the amps, but only for curiosity sake. The load bank is just to see how it reacts under load, not looking for specific info other than volts and hertz.
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Ignoramus29240 wrote:

If you are going to run into a water container, just run it into copper electrodes and vary the salt content of the solution until you're running the desired current. This will work up to a few hundred amps, no idea what amperage you're talking about.
GWE
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Grant Erwin wrote:

The salt water load was widely used. They used wood barrels and used them outside because of the gas generated
Bill K7NOM
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An easily obtainable load is a "bank" of 120v, 200 Watt, ordinary incandescent light bulbs. 200 Watts (120v) is suggested because that is the largest size commonly stocked at home supply stores in the US. European lamps may be available for 240v operation.
Place 2 of the 200W lamps in series for a 0.4 kW load. Stack these strings of 2, in parallel, to obtain any amount of load. Single phase or 3-phase loading is possible; just remember 2 lamps in series = 0.4 kW per phase. A clamp-on type ammeter is recommended to determine the amount of current flowing to the load.
Bob Swinney

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"i"
I prefer old (used because they are free) electric stove top elements. They are common for 220vac. I have a suitcase sized, fan cooled load for 220 that will disipate 50 KW for a few minutes, 25 KW for long term. If you prefer water cooloed, you may have a special need to miniaturize. Fans and heaters can be alot tidier that a water boiler. If you do build a decent water cooled load for 110/220 I'd sure like to see how you do it.
Jerry
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Jerry Martes wrote:

It's an obviousity, but since the OP didn't appear to think about air cooled stuff, he might not realize that they will work as 120 volt loads too.
Jeff
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They will, but they will burn 4 times less energy. Plus, I need 220v to provide a balanced load to a 220v capable generator.
i
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Yes, a one cylinder diesel. I thought that exhaust noise accounted for the bulk of the noise, but, apparently, that was not the case.
Diesel trucks, say, are not nearly as noisy. Rental diesel gensets, the sort that I see at fairs etc, are also very quiet.

Sure. No problem. Take whatever $$ you feel are appropriate for the work and materials, and maybe you can mail the rest back to me.
i
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I like your idea a lot. Will try to see if anyone throws away an old electric stove. If not, elements for those stoves are not very expensive new.
i
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