3-in-1 oil rant


So I've had this "tin" of 3-in-1 oil around for years - for the yearly
4-drop oiling of the radiant heating pump motors.
Went to the hardware store for another "tin" of 3-in-1, and it's now
in a PLASTIC bottle! ( same shape, just really cheesy plastic).
Bought it anyway, 'cause I need the oil.
I'm going to re-inject it back into the metal tin because I'm
old-school & I like the old metal can.
I'm going to write (WD-40 products, is it now?) and complain about the
cheesiness of the new plastic cheap-*ss looking bottle.
Meanwhile,.. is plain old 20 weight non-detergent motor oil the same
thing as the old 3-in-1 ?...and OK to use in electric pump motors?
Thanks for reading my rant! ;)
Cheers!
Bart
Reply to
bart
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My girlfriend gave me an old tin oil can for Christmas. I think I'll keep her.
Reply to
cavelamb
The blue label is the motor oil:
MikeB
Reply to
BQ340
Indeed. I remember reading the results of some tests which had been done to determine the viscosity of ordinary 3-in-1 oil (done by a fishing reel enthusiast, I think). Ordinary 3-in-1 was closer to ISO 10 than ISO 20.
Chris
Reply to
Christopher Tidy
How does ISO compare to SAE???
Reply to
clare
I got a bunch of oil cans from Dad's estate. Almost all have lost their click-click ability. Anyway to restore that so they will pump oil?
Paul
Reply to
co_farmer
You'll only keep her if you deserve her and treat her well, but she's telling you she likes ya and willing to journey with you for a while.
Reply to
Don Foreman
First 3 in 1 is NOT automotive oil. There is no additive package in 3 in 1. Further more, the viscosity of 3 in 1 is about 150 Saybolt, which is closer to SAE 10 than to SAE 20. SAE viscosity is the same as ISO. All ISO standards are adopted from existing other national or industrial standards. Steve
Reply to
Steve Lusardi
ISO and SAE viscosity numbers are not the same.
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Reply to
Ned Simmons
Yeah.
I hear that.
Reply to
cavelamb
ISO is used for measuring film, as also ASA.
SAE is used for measuring oil. That said, I would guess three in one is closer to 10 weight. Three in one tends to dry out. And get sticky. Same deal with sewing machine oil.
For electric motors, I've heard to use ND20 or ND30. A product called "zoom spout turbine oil" is also excellent, and comes with a nice dispenser bottle.
My old three in one oil can, I was able to pry out the dropper, and fill it with a larger can. WD-40 used to be sold in metal galon cans (gone plastic) and metal trigger spray bottles (which are now plastic). Can't get good quality, any more.
Reply to
Stormin Mormon
Both WD-40 and 3-in-1 are perfumed, to impress you that you've done some manly effort, distinguish the brand in your memory, and hide the fact that you're paying a lot of money for a thimble of mineral oil. In 3-in-1 it seems to my sense like the magic perfume is nothing but camphor. Not sure what they prefume WD-40 with, but it kind of smells like coconut. I suspect WD-40 is highly refined to lower sulfur content, which also makes it smell sweeter than most petroleum distillates.
Reply to
Richard J Kinch
And the SAE (Society of Automotive Engineers), like ISO, promulgates all sorts of specs.
There *is* an ISO system for specifying oil viscosity, and it's widely used in the US, but not generally for engine oil. I posted a conversion chart to SAE viscosity earlier. Here it is again.
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Reply to
Ned Simmons
I'm partial to minty-fresh Mystery Oil.
Reply to
Ned Simmons
I was on a board that claimed a MMO soak would decarbon my piston rings and lower oil consumption. The deal was you pulled the plugs, poured in MMO though the hole, and then changed the oil the next day morning. During the night the MMO was supposed to be loosening up the carbon and the oil change was to deal with the MMO eventually ending up in the crankcase.
So I go to AutoZone, ask for some MMO, I get a blank stare followed by we have had the request before and no one knows what it is.
I eventually figured out that MMO is Marvel Mystery Oil. Btw, it didn't do much for oil consumption but I gave it a whirl.
Wes
Reply to
Wes
IF ypour oil consumption or low compression is caused by stuck rings, MMO added to the crankcase oil can very often solve the problem - over a period of time. Put the compression back to 100% even on a Subaru engine on a friend's plane (that had sat for 2 years) in about 20 minutes of ground running.
Reply to
clare
Mite take one you can live without oil - and try a propane torch on the center of the bottom and dunk it in water.
Just a guess and what you need to search out is spring metal tempering.
Good luck
Martin
snipped-for-privacy@co>> bart wrote:
Reply to
Martin H. Eastburn
ISO is industrial standards oil while SAE is automotive and contains stuff to float metal to be filtered out - not back to the oil pump to hammer it to death.
Chemically they are different. Weight grade is different.
Use SAE on the car / tractor and such- ISO on mills and lathes and shop stuff.
Martin
Ned Simm> >
Reply to
Martin H. Eastburn
It's true that automotive oils tend to use SAE viscosity grading, and industrial oils are more likely to carry ISO numbers. But the ISO and SAE viscosity grades are simply that: measures of viscosity. They do not specify the composition of the oil or its suitability for a particular use.
Reply to
Ned Simmons
I have a metal can of 3- in- 1 that says it is for electric motors. I've had it for years and have looked numerous times in the the stores for more of it. Apparently it is not sold anymore. I think it is 20 W.
Bob Swinney
D> >
Yeah.
I hear that.
Reply to
Robert Swinney

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