304 Rod Machining

On 30/01/2016 12:11 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:


JB couldn't cut the mustard here. He'd be lost without his modern high tech CNC machine shop. Nearest CNC I know of is a lathe over in Wagga Wagga, an hour away. And it's an older one.
To revive an old SIG:
Jon (the sane one)
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On 30/01/2016 10:59 AM, Ed Huntress wrote:

Well, worked 3 years at NASA Ames, high school and college work exp, almost 2 years at Spectra Physics, and almost 2 years at Varian. All the rest of my work was for small shops where safety was, shall we say, up to us, and insisting on it could cost one promotions, if not one's job (under some other pretext). Yeah, a few shit job shops.
Obviously, the three mentioned above had well established safety programs, and that was about the extent of my exposure to regulations. Then there was 20 years working out of my garage. I did more than a few things I would never have let an employee do. Paperwork was held to the absolute minimum.
So, I hired in the same week the sale to our corporate owners was finalized. Outgoing fitter, in one of the few bits of serious advice I got from him, told me to "watch my back because nobody else will, and there are things here that'll kill ya quick".
That had a lot to do with my joining the safety committee, were I got a 2 day class in WHS. And that really didn't come near fully touching all the regulations. We're implementing programs and controls fast as we can, but still have a ways to go. Some of it I think is over the top nanny statism. But it's all geared to keeping us safe. Because getting hurt costs the corporation money, and lost productivity. Hey, might as well be up front about it. They do care about us, but the class weighed in heavily on the long term costs to the company for injuries. And they are substantial! We're still working on issues of small town people that have never been expose to anything like the corporate world, and seem more concerned about getting pissed on the weekend (drunk) than worrying about things like safety. But making progress, finally went a month with no lost time injuries, something not seen in a long long time.
I've heard tales of companies with controls so strict, one had to fill out paperwork to change a friggin light bulb. Heaven help you if you gotta go weld on something. And an accident on the railroad apparently earns one a day or two of paperwork.
Since my exposure to regulations in the States is decades old, hard to compare. Things are different now I'm sure. But I'd say while AU is something of a nanny state, a lot of things Americans take as normal, are less common here.
On food safety, well, no training in that, and not needed for my work. I do see the issues QA raises, some of them seem annoyingly minor. But, when Safeway comes through to inspect, if things aren't up to their standards, you don't get the contract. So we're having to come up to US standards in that area. Seems to be less issues with food safety in terms of contamination, etc here compared to the states, so that seems a bit odd. but then, the whole dang country has a smaller population than California, so I'd expect less total incidents.
My attitude is, I'm getting paid by the hour, and paid well. They want me to fill out paperwork, I'll fill out paperwork!
As for the promotion, I'm 59 in a few months. Spent today replacing wear plates, screen and hammers in a hammer mill. Big heavy stuff. A desk job in a heated/cooled office is looking real good these days!
Jon
ps: pm coming
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On Sat, 30 Jan 2016 16:35:18 +1100, Jon Anderson

It sounds like you're enjoying it overall, and it must be interesting. Regarding food safety: Every big e. coli or listeria contamination now gets nationwide attention here, so it appears that resistance to food-safety issues has dwindled in recent years. I remember when the loony-tune fringe of the libertarians (actually, neo-anarchists, some of which are still on misc.survivalist.nutjobs) were bitching about regulations in food and pharmaceuticals, saying that it was expensive and that anyone who was UNsafe would quickly go out of business, so there was nothing to regulate.
They're pretty quiet now.
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Ed Huntress

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On 1/28/2016 4:45 PM, Ed Huntress wrote:

When supplying the food industry with wire brushes the Stainless Steel spec. was for 302, I can't tell you why except that 302 is the most common alloy wire available and it handles much better than any other alloy. I hated working with 304 the most.
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wrote:

The spec on 302 is almost identical to that for 304, except that 302 has twice as much carbon. Both 302 and 304 have half the sulfur of 303, which is why 303 machines so easily.
I'm rusty on this (forgive the pun), but my recollection is that it's the sulfur that enables pitting in 303.
I see lots of info on using different grades of stainless in food processing on the Web. They might help Jon.
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Interestingly I made the pins with 303. My plan was to just bend an L bend on them, but I decided I needed to make a bending jig to do that well, and it was faster to machine the ends and put cross handles on. My local metal yard (the one I like) only had 304 on hand.
I am aware of stainless work hardening, and took a fairly agressive feed I thought. I got beaughtiful continuous chips to start each cross drill. Maybe I should drill more agressively? Maybe even program stuff like that with a particular familiar stock with three drill operations?
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