A36 Steel Beam deflection

On Sat, 14 Jul 2007 22:45:31 GMT, "Michael A. Terrell"


Construction adhesives are your friends, and should be used quite liberally and between all layers of structure, subfloor and finished floor, even if you don't *have* to.
Especially important if you are building a wood-framed house and you don't want the floors to squeak and drive you nuts every time someone walks around.
--<< Bruce >>--
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"Bruce L. Bergman" wrote:

I think I used six full tubes of liquid nail when I built the floors of a portable double wide workshop about 15 years ago. It was two 8' * 20' modules built on a frame of 2" * 12" on 6" centers, with a double header on the long sides. It was sitting on more pads than a mobile home 20 feet away, yet it sank a couple inches into the ground. Luckily, it was three full concrete blocks off the pads. Even though it was built for electronics, I ended up overloading it so bad that I warped the floors. I left home for a few months to build the Ch 58 TV station in Destin, and was only home a few hours each weekend. Several times I'd find parts i needed, only to have to take everything to get the few parts I needed. By the time the TV station was complete I couldn't even get past the door. (Luckily, it opened OUT!) ;-)
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I do mix and match with both steel and wood beams in old houses. Things like opening up a load bearing wall. 12x22 'W' shapes and similar.
For this sort of work it's interesting that a steel beam and a engineered wood beam have roughly the same cross section in terms of space taken up. ie a pair of 12" LVL beams are roughly equal to a 12"x22 steel section in strength, both take up about 12"x4" of building space. The steel is stiffer if that is the limiting factor but more work to attach joists and such to the sides. Easist way to attach to the steel is powder fasteners but 1-1/2" of wood and 1/4" of steel takes a bigger load than my tools will handle.

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Most professional CAD packages have section property functions included. As for 'reliably,' a few test cases with known answers would be advisable, both to check accuracy and to verify the user's understanding of nomenclature/sign/units conventions being followed. In limited experience with several CAD programs I have encountered errors of both types. Before CAD software became available to me, I used to use a handy little BASIC program from a softcover book of engineering application programs for the Apple II+ computer :-)
David Merrill
P.S.: If you know of a design program that reliably calculates the section modulus (inches**3) and the moment of inertia (inches**4) from a section's cad drawing, I'd really appreciate letting me know. I often run into cobbled-together-sections to analyze, and I'm tired of doing these tedious calcs by hand. W.
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