Adjusting Lathe Chuck Jaws faster on my atlas lathe

On Fri, 13 Feb 2015 14:23:52 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@baldwin-telecom.net wrote:


Several years ago I watched a show about the unearthing of metal Roman artifacts in England. They had many examples of weapons that had bronze handles and iron alloy blades. An "excellent" sample was shown and almost all of the iron had rusted away, just a thin delicate iron oxide blade was left. Most of the stuff dug up, when in the ground still, would be a bronze handle with a blade made up of rust colored earth with no solid iron left. Eric
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/13/2015 6:16 PM, snipped-for-privacy@whidbey.com wrote:

We are coming :-) - that is there is a machine and software that takes pictures and converts them into objects.
Slices are what are used in 3-D printers - print a slice at a time.
Simply get the scraper to take level down, photo it many times, scrape and replete.
Then into the software all of the pictures and it makes a 3-D model in CAD - allowing a Plastic or Metal or ... material to reproduce the real thing for a show. Painting and texture makes it look real.
Martin
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

http://www.livescience.com/17222-stradivari-violin-recreated-ct.html
I first heard of this being used to make durable replicas of fragile fossil bone fragments. http://www.sciencenewsdaily.org/archaeology-fossils-news/cluster470646366/
-jsw
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/14/2015 7:03 AM, Jim Wilkins wrote:

I have a 3-D , still trying to get it really working. mostly works.
There are 3-D's that make body organs !!! and all sorts of things. Whole bumper system - for verification and bolting on...
List goes on and on.
The neat one is making candy and icing. 65K colors and the fancy food line.
Martin
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload


Segway was an early user of 3-D printing for prototype parts. My initial dislike of it came from reworking and patching the brittle plastic with epoxy, until they got an ABS machine that could make durable structural components including hinges.
The plastic ink for the mid-80's Howtek ink jet printer that triggered 3-D was quite brittle when printed, though strong when injection-molded.
In addition to precisely placing dots of ink we could put a jet in continuous squirtgun mode with a Purge cycle. No one was a skilled enough artist or sculptor to take good advantage of this, they only used it for blotchy freehand tee shirts. The corporate (gun) culture wasn't right for me to mentioned or try to imitate Jackson Pollock.
-jsw
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

    Not for me. On-Topic postings are welcome -- even if they prompt discussion as to their advisability. (And even that improves the on-topic to off-topic ratio. :-)
    However -- for reversing the jaws on my 6-1/4" 3-jaw there is no need to run them out and back in -- I use two-part jaws so I can use soft jaws at need.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
--
Remove oil spill source from e-mail
Email: < snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com> | (KV4PH) Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jim- On the topic of history of the old tools you asked about, here's what I have so far (from a fellow blacksmith who is just starting to write a book: "I just started my research on a book on the history of Blacksmithing. I have some information but take it with a grain of salt. It is just from the beginning of the search.
Bronze rasps have been found in Egyptian tombs from about 1200BC. Iron rasps in Mesopotamia for around 700 BC. Hardened metal files date back to the Middle Ages around the 12th century AD.
There is a hacksaw in the Viking Mastermyr tool chest found in Sweden. That chest is generally believed to date to the late Viking/early medieval period ( around 1000 AD).
As to the leg vice, I do not have much detail yet. However, there is a clear depiction of them in Denis Diderot's Encyclopedie published in France between 1750-1770."
If I do get any more info, I will start a new topic.
Pete Stanaitis --------------
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/14/2015 8:13 AM, snipped-for-privacy@baldwin-telecom.net wrote:

Pete -
Georgius Agricola De Re Metallica - re-printed and translated - was on WWW.kessinger.net - might still be - I think Amazon took over printing of his data - I believe the owner passed. Anyway - good book.
This was first printed in 1520. It has some really interesting information. Documented earlier date for iron and so on. Methods, pictures (wood cuts) and is 8x10x 1.5" (approx) in size.
isbn 0766131971
Martin
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 14 Feb 2015 22:06:13 -0600, Martin Eastburn

Showing only Amazon sales on that page.

download PDF here: https://archive.org/details/deremetallica50agri I grabbed a Kindle format of it.
--
Silence is more musical than any song.
-- Christina Rossetti
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

And here's Diderot's Encyclopedie https://archive.org/details/encyclopdieoudi03alemgoog
And, just for you, the Cold Steel Saber Training Manual. ;) http://www.thearma.org/pdf/ColdSteel.pdf
--
A sound mind in a sound body is a short but full description
of a happy state in this world.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.